Aloha teachers: teacher autonomy support promotes Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander students’ motivation, school belonging, course-taking and math achievement

John Mark Froiland, Mark L. Davison, Frank C. Worrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Among 110 Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, teacher autonomy support in 9th grade significantly predicted intrinsic motivation for math in 9th grade as well as math course-taking over the next 2 years, both of which in turn significantly predicted math achievement by 11th grade. In a second model, teacher autonomy support was positively associated with sense of school belonging; however, school belonging did not predict math achievement. Because of the Hawaiian cultural concept of Aloha and the effect of teacher autonomy support on intrinsic motivation, school belonging, math course-taking, and math achievement, researchers may wish to develop interventions for Hawaiian students that focus on elevating intrinsic motivation and belonging via increasing teacher autonomy support. Because Native Hawaiians and most other Pacific Islanders are involuntary minorities, this research may have implications for other involuntary minorities across the world, such as the Buraku in Japan, and the Maori people of New Zealand.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)879-894
Number of pages16
JournalSocial Psychology of Education
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • Achievement
  • Adolescence
  • Autonomy support
  • Hawaii
  • High school students
  • Interest
  • Intrinsic motivation
  • Involuntary minorities
  • School belonging
  • Teachers

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