Allostasis and the development of internalizing and externalizing problems: Changing relations with physiological systems across adolescence

Paul D. Hastings, Elizabeth A. Shirtcliff, Bonnie Klimes-Dougan, Amber L. Allison, Laura Derose, Kimberley T. Kendziora, Barbara A. Usher, Carolyn Zahn-Waxler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Allostasis, or the maintenance of stability through physiological change, refers to the process by which individuals adjust to the continually changing demands that are put upon somatic activity by salient events. Bauer and colleagues proposed that allostasis could be detected through patterns of the joint reactivity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and hypothalamic - pituitary - adrenal (HPA) axis system under stressful conditions. We examined the associations between ANS and HPA reactivity and the development of externalizing and internalizing problems over 2 years in a sample of 215 adolescents. The interactions of ANS and HPA reactivity were contemporaneously associated with, and longitudinally predictive of, adolescents' emotional and behavioral problems. Adolescents with symmetrical high reactivity across systems had more internalizing and fewer externalizing problems initially. Over time, both symmetrical and asymmetrical reactivity predicted increasing internalizing problems in girls, depending on the measure of ANS activity that was examined, heart rate, or blood pressure reactivity. Implications for the understanding of allostasis and the dynamic nature of the relations between multiple physiological regulatory systems and adolescents' developing psychopathology are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1149-1165
Number of pages17
JournalDevelopment and psychopathology
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

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