Allegiance Performed: Waṭaniyyah Poetry on the Stage of the Shāʿir al-Milyūn Competition

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines the understudied political dynamics of the televised nabaṭī poetry competition Shāʿir al-Milyūn (“Million’s Poet”) to offer a new understanding of the program. Media coverage has focused on the participation of a single female participant, while scholars have assessed Shāʿir al-Milyūn as primarily an experiment in the wedding of local tradition to modern technology, overlooking the central and complex negotiations of ruler-ruled relationships taking place on the show’s stage. Shāʿir al-Milyūn’s political aspect becomes particularly apparent in the regular performances of waṭaniyyah verse, i.e. poetry for the waṭan or homeland. Reading a waṭaniyyah poem performed during the fifth season of Shāʿir al-Milyūn by Emirati poet Aḥmad bin Hayyāy al-Manṣūrī, I argue that Shāʿir al-Milyūn, rather than merely celebrating local poetic tradition, operates as a political technology that provides both poetry contestants and the show’s princely patron with opportunities to articulate and enact expectations of proper citizenship.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-196
JournalJournal of Arabic Literature
Volume50
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2019

Fingerprint

poetry
writer
wedding
Homelands
citizenship
coverage
participation
experiment
performance
Allegiance
Poetry
Poet
Poem
Homeland
Local Traditions
Poetic Tradition
Verse
Regular
Patron
Ruler

Keywords

  • nabaṭī poetry; waṭaniyyah; United Arab Emirates; Shāʿir al-Milyūn; allegiance; competition; Aḥmad bin Hayyāy al-Manṣūrī; heritage discourse; nation-building; treason; Iṣlāḥ

Cite this

Allegiance Performed: Waṭaniyyah Poetry on the Stage of the Shāʿir al-Milyūn Competition. / Vanpee, Katrien.

In: Journal of Arabic Literature, Vol. 50, No. 2, 2019, p. 173-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8de8b05a763e4a9aa9a52164a9907b50,
title = "Allegiance Performed: Waṭaniyyah Poetry on the Stage of the Shāʿir al-Milyūn Competition",
abstract = "This article examines the understudied political dynamics of the televised nabaṭī poetry competition Shāʿir al-Milyūn (“Million’s Poet”) to offer a new understanding of the program. Media coverage has focused on the participation of a single female participant, while scholars have assessed Shāʿir al-Milyūn as primarily an experiment in the wedding of local tradition to modern technology, overlooking the central and complex negotiations of ruler-ruled relationships taking place on the show’s stage. Shāʿir al-Milyūn’s political aspect becomes particularly apparent in the regular performances of waṭaniyyah verse, i.e. poetry for the waṭan or homeland. Reading a waṭaniyyah poem performed during the fifth season of Shāʿir al-Milyūn by Emirati poet Aḥmad bin Hayyāy al-Manṣūrī, I argue that Shāʿir al-Milyūn, rather than merely celebrating local poetic tradition, operates as a political technology that provides both poetry contestants and the show’s princely patron with opportunities to articulate and enact expectations of proper citizenship.",
keywords = "nabaṭī poetry; waṭaniyyah; United Arab Emirates; Shāʿir al-Milyūn; allegiance; competition; Aḥmad bin Hayyāy al-Manṣūrī; heritage discourse; nation-building; treason; Iṣlāḥ",
author = "Katrien Vanpee",
year = "2019",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "50",
pages = "173--196",
journal = "Journal of Arabic Literature",
issn = "0085-2376",
publisher = "Brill",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Allegiance Performed: Waṭaniyyah Poetry on the Stage of the Shāʿir al-Milyūn Competition

AU - Vanpee, Katrien

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - This article examines the understudied political dynamics of the televised nabaṭī poetry competition Shāʿir al-Milyūn (“Million’s Poet”) to offer a new understanding of the program. Media coverage has focused on the participation of a single female participant, while scholars have assessed Shāʿir al-Milyūn as primarily an experiment in the wedding of local tradition to modern technology, overlooking the central and complex negotiations of ruler-ruled relationships taking place on the show’s stage. Shāʿir al-Milyūn’s political aspect becomes particularly apparent in the regular performances of waṭaniyyah verse, i.e. poetry for the waṭan or homeland. Reading a waṭaniyyah poem performed during the fifth season of Shāʿir al-Milyūn by Emirati poet Aḥmad bin Hayyāy al-Manṣūrī, I argue that Shāʿir al-Milyūn, rather than merely celebrating local poetic tradition, operates as a political technology that provides both poetry contestants and the show’s princely patron with opportunities to articulate and enact expectations of proper citizenship.

AB - This article examines the understudied political dynamics of the televised nabaṭī poetry competition Shāʿir al-Milyūn (“Million’s Poet”) to offer a new understanding of the program. Media coverage has focused on the participation of a single female participant, while scholars have assessed Shāʿir al-Milyūn as primarily an experiment in the wedding of local tradition to modern technology, overlooking the central and complex negotiations of ruler-ruled relationships taking place on the show’s stage. Shāʿir al-Milyūn’s political aspect becomes particularly apparent in the regular performances of waṭaniyyah verse, i.e. poetry for the waṭan or homeland. Reading a waṭaniyyah poem performed during the fifth season of Shāʿir al-Milyūn by Emirati poet Aḥmad bin Hayyāy al-Manṣūrī, I argue that Shāʿir al-Milyūn, rather than merely celebrating local poetic tradition, operates as a political technology that provides both poetry contestants and the show’s princely patron with opportunities to articulate and enact expectations of proper citizenship.

KW - nabaṭī poetry; waṭaniyyah; United Arab Emirates; Shāʿir al-Milyūn; allegiance; competition; Aḥmad bin Hayyāy al-Manṣūrī; heritage discourse; nation-building; treason; Iṣlāḥ

M3 - Article

VL - 50

SP - 173

EP - 196

JO - Journal of Arabic Literature

JF - Journal of Arabic Literature

SN - 0085-2376

IS - 2

ER -