All-cause hospitalizations for inflammatory bowel diseases: Can the reason for admission provide information on inpatient resource use? A study from a large veteran affairs hospital

Ashish Malhotra, K. C. Mandip, Aasma Shaukat, Thomas Rector

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are group of chronic inflammatory illnesses with a remitting and relapsing course that may result in appreciable morbidity and high medical costs secondary to repeated hospitalizations. The study's objectives were to identify the reasons for hospitalization among patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, and compare inpatient courses and readmission rates for IBD-related admissions versus non-IBD-related admissions. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients with IBD admitted to the Minneapolis VA Medical Center between September 2010 and September 2012. Results: A total of 111 patients with IBD were admitted during the 2-year study period. IBD flares/complications accounted for36.9% of the index admissions. Atherothrombotic events comprised the second most common cause of admissions (14.4%) in IBD patients. Patients with an index admission directly related to IBD were significantly younger and had developed IBD more recently. Unsurprisingly, the IBD admission group had significantly more gastrointestinal endoscopies and abdominal surgeries, and was more likely to be started on medication for IBD during the index stay. The median length of stay (LOS) for the index hospitalization for an IBD flare or complication was 4 (2-8) days compared with2 (1-4) days for the other patients (P = 0.001). A smaller percentage of the group admitted for an IBD flare/complication had a shorter ICU stay compared with the other patients (9.8% vs. 15.7%, respectively); however, their ICU LOSs tended to be longer (4.5 vs. 2.0days, respectively, P = 0.17). Compared to the other admission types, an insignificantly greater percentage of the group whose index admission was related to an IBD flare or complication had at least one readmission within 6months of discharge (29% versus 21%; P = 0.35). The rate of admission was approximately 80% greater in the group whose index admission was related to an IBD flare or complication compared to the other types of admission (rate ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval 0.96 to 3.4), although this difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.07). Conclusion: Identifying the reasons for the patients' index admission, IBD flares versus all other causes, may provide valuable information concerning admission care and the subsequent admission history.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number28
JournalMilitary Medical Research
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 6 2016

Keywords

  • Inflammatory bowel diseases
  • Readmission rate
  • Veteran affairs

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