Albumin adsorption onto surfaces of urine collection and analysis containers

Mary K. Robinson, Samuel P. Caudill, David D. Koch, James Ritchie, Glen Hortin, John H. Eckfeldt, Sverre Sandberg, Desmond Williams, Gary Myers, W. Greg Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Adsorption of albumin onto urine collection and analysis containers may cause falsely low concentrations. Methods: We added 125I-labeled human serum albumin to urine and to phosphate buffered solutions, incubated them with 22 plastic container materials and measured adsorption by liquid scintillation counting. Results: Adsorption of urine albumin (UA) at 5-6. mg/l was <. 0.9%; and at 90. mg/l was <. 0.4%. Adsorption was generally less at pH. 8 than pH. 5 but only 3 cases had p. <. 0.05. Adsorption from 11 unaltered urine samples with albumin 5-333. mg/l was <. 0.8%. Albumin adsorption for the material with greatest binding was extrapolated to the surface areas of 100. ml and 2. l collection containers, and to instrument sample cups and showed <. 1% change in concentration at 5. mg/l and <. 0.5% change at 20. mg/l or higher concentrations. Adsorption of albumin from phosphate buffered solutions (2-28%) was larger than that from urine. Conclusions: Albumin adsorption differed among urine samples and plastic materials, but the total influence of adsorption was <. 1% for all materials and urine samples tested. Adsorption of albumin from phosphate buffered solutions was larger than that from urine and could be a limitation for preparations used as calibrators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-45
Number of pages6
JournalClinica Chimica Acta
Volume431
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2014

Keywords

  • Albumin adsorption
  • Urine albumin
  • Urine containers

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