Airway management for deep sedation: Current practice, limitations, and needs as identified by clinical observation and survey results

Roxanne McMurray, Logan Becker, Kelley Frost Olsen, Megan McMurray

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Using deep sedation, adjunct airway devices such as oral or nasal airways are frequently required to maintain airway patency. Traditional oral airways (TOAs, made of rigid plastic) or nasal airways (made of pliable materials) can be associated with adverse effects, contributing to a trend of anesthesia providers placing nasal airways orally. A clinical observational study and an electronic provider survey were conducted to examine this emerging practice. The observation study objective was to investigate reported postoperative sore throat occurrence associated with use of either a nontraditional airway (nasal airway used orally) or TOA in deep sedation procedures (N = 243). Patients receiving nontraditional airways reported significantly less postoperative sore throat than those receiving TOAs (17% vs 40%, respectively; P < .001). These results prompted a broader exploration into airway practices of anesthesia providers via an electronic survey. Most respondents (n = 293) reported adverse effects, including gagging/coughing on insertion, oral cavity injury, and bleeding with TOAs. More than half (52.8%) reported using nasal airways orally. These results suggest a clinical void in current airway management options for deep sedation. Providers indicated the need for airway devices that provide a patent airway while mitigating adverse effects associated with commonly used airways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-129
Number of pages7
JournalAANA Journal
Volume88
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 AANA Publishing Inc.. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Airway complications
  • Deep monitored anesthesia care (MAC)
  • Deep sedation
  • Oral and nasal airways
  • Postoperative sore throat

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Airway management for deep sedation: Current practice, limitations, and needs as identified by clinical observation and survey results'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this