Age alone is not a contraindication to kidney donation: Outcomes of donor nephrectomy in the elderly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

With increasing organ demand, living kidney donation from older donors (>60-years-old) has become more common. Between 1975 and 2014, 3752 donor nephrectomies (DN) were performed at University of Minnesota; 167 (4.5%) were >60-years-old Short- and long-term outcomes were compared between contemporaneous >60-years-old and <60-years-old donors. On univariate analysis, >60-years-old were more likely to have had prior abdominal surgery and hypertension; and less likely to smoke. Baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was lower in >60-years-old (80 ± 16 vs 101 ± 26 mL/min/1.73 m2; P <.001). Intraoperative and postoperative complications were similar, except a higher prevalence of <30 day ileus (3% vs 7%; P =.021) and longer postoperative length of stay (LOS) (4.2 vs 4.6 days; P =.005). On multivariate analysis, <30 day ileus and LOS continued to be significantly greater for >60-years-old After >20 years post-DN, systolic blood pressure was significantly higher among >60-years-old (142 vs 125 mm Hg; P <.001) and HTN was diagnosed earlier (9 vs 14 years). After donation, eGFR was significantly lower for >60-years-old but slope of eGFR and rates of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were not significantly different >20 years post-DN. Thus, kidney donation among carefully selected >60-years-old poses minimal perioperative risks and no added risk of long-term ESRD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere13287
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018

Keywords

  • donor nephrectomy
  • elderly
  • living donor kidney transplant

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Age alone is not a contraindication to kidney donation: Outcomes of donor nephrectomy in the elderly'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this