African American Parents’ Educational Involvement in Urban Schools: Contextualized Strategies for Student Success in Adolescence

James P. Huguley, Lori Delale-O’Connor, Ming Te Wang, Alyssa K. Parr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Research on parental educational involvement has been organized into three overarching domains—home-based involvement, school-based involvement, and academic socialization. Conventional empirical work in these domains typically centers involvement strategies around White, middle-class experiences rather than examining how optimal parenting approaches vary by race and context. Even fewer studies have explored the manifestations of involvement across these categories in underresourced urban educational settings. In response, the current study draws on the voices of African American parents and their children attending urban public schools to describe the distinct approaches to home-based involvement, school-based involvement, and academic socialization that parents use to ensure a quality education for their children. Findings demonstrate how African American parents engage in racially infused and contextually tailored navigational involvement approaches as they seek to offset the effects of inhibiting educational contexts. Results add ecological nuance and new typologies to how parental involvement in education is conceptualized across the settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEducational Researcher
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Black education
  • focus group interviews
  • identity
  • in-depth interviewing
  • parents and families
  • qualitative research
  • race
  • social context
  • urban education

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