African American grandmothers as caregivers: Answering the call to help their grandchildren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

African American grandmothers are increasingly assuming the role of "new mothers again" to care for their grandchildren whose parents are absent from the household. Why these older women decide to take on becoming a new mother again after their primary parenting days are over has not been dear. This article uses a phenomenological perspective to describe, in their own words, the experiences of 12 African American grandmothers and why they assumed the parental role for their grandchildren. Six interrelated themes emerged: (a) tradition of kinkeeping: (b) relationship with grandchildren; (c) distrust of the foster care system; (d) grandmother as only the resource; (e) strong relationship with the Lord; and (f) refusal of the grandchild's other grandmother to assist with caregiving. These themes are used as a guide to make recommendations to enhance the lives of grandmothers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-43
Number of pages9
JournalFamilies in Society
Volume83
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'African American grandmothers as caregivers: Answering the call to help their grandchildren'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this