Africa

Beware of Obama's second term

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Obama's rise to the U.S. presidency in 2008 gave many supporters of Africa the false hope that U.S. policy toward Africa would become more progressive. When such a shift failed to transpire, advocates argued that the major economic crisis in the U.S. monopolized the president's attention and that his second term would create new opportunities for the continent. These claims failed to take into account the deep-rooted U.S. interests that dominate Africa policy with or without Obama. In addition, most of the Africa advocates have ignored the influence of the new breed of African Americans who staff key positions in the Department of State and whose priority is their own careers rather than a just policy toward the continent. Finally, most African leaders have not advocated for African interests and instead have pursued their particularistic agendas, leaving Africa vulnerable. Given this context, it is unlikely that Obama's second term will introduce an Africa-friendly policy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-183
Number of pages5
JournalAfrican Studies Review
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

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Africa policy
economic crisis
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American

Keywords

  • 2012 presidential election

Cite this

Africa : Beware of Obama's second term. / Samatar, Abdi I.

In: African Studies Review, Vol. 56, No. 2, 01.09.2013, p. 179-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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