Aerosol detection and transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (Prrsv): What is the evidence, and what are the knowledge gaps?

Andréia Gonçalves Arruda, Steve Tousignant, Juan Sanhueza, Carles Vilalta, Zvonimir Poljak, Montserrat Torremorell, Carmen Alonso, Cesar A. Corzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In human and veterinary medicine, there have been multiple reports of pathogens being airborne under experimental and field conditions, highlighting the importance of this transmission route. These studies shed light on different aspects related to airborne transmission such as the capability of pathogens becoming airborne, the ability of pathogens to remain infectious while airborne, the role played by environmental conditions in pathogen dissemination, and pathogen strain as an interfering factor in airborne transmission. Data showing that airborne pathogens originating from an infectious individual or population can infect susceptible hosts are scarce, especially under field conditions. Furthermore, even though disease outbreak investigations have generated important information identifying potential ports of entry of pathogens into populations, these investigations do not necessarily yield clear answers on mechanisms by which pathogens have been introduced into populations. In swine, the aerosol transmission route gained popularity during the late 1990’s as suspicions of airborne transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were growing. Several studies were conducted within the last 15 years contributing to the understanding of this transmission route; however, questions still remain. This paper reviews the current knowledge and identifies knowledge gaps related to PRRSV airborne transmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number712
JournalViruses
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2019

Fingerprint

Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus
Aerosols
Population
Veterinary Medicine
Disease Outbreaks
Swine

Keywords

  • Aerosol
  • Airborne
  • Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome
  • Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)
  • Transmission

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review

Cite this

Aerosol detection and transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (Prrsv) : What is the evidence, and what are the knowledge gaps? / Arruda, Andréia Gonçalves; Tousignant, Steve; Sanhueza, Juan; Vilalta, Carles; Poljak, Zvonimir; Torremorell, Montserrat; Alonso, Carmen; Corzo, Cesar A.

In: Viruses, Vol. 11, No. 8, 712, 08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arruda, Andréia Gonçalves ; Tousignant, Steve ; Sanhueza, Juan ; Vilalta, Carles ; Poljak, Zvonimir ; Torremorell, Montserrat ; Alonso, Carmen ; Corzo, Cesar A. / Aerosol detection and transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (Prrsv) : What is the evidence, and what are the knowledge gaps?. In: Viruses. 2019 ; Vol. 11, No. 8.
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