Adverse experiences as predictors of maladaptive and adaptive eating: Findings from EAT 2018

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Abstract

Adverse experiences, such as childhood abuse and other violence victimization, are associated with problematic eating. However, whether different types of adversity relate to both maladaptive and adaptive eating behaviors is unclear. This study examined the associations of different adverse experiences with maladaptive (i.e., overeating and binge eating) and adaptive (i.e., intuitive eating and mindful eating) eating by gender. Data were derived from the EAT-2018 (Eating and Activity over Time) study (N = 1411, aged 18–30 years in 2017–2018). Modified Poisson regressions were used to examine the associations between adverse experiences and the prevalence of maladaptive eating. Linear regressions were used to examine the associations between adverse experiences and adaptive eating scores. Each adverse experience was associated with greater prevalence of maladaptive eating and lower adaptive eating scores. Among women, intimate partner sexual violence was strongly associated with more overeating (PR = 2.1 [95% CI = 1.4–3.1]) and binge eating (PR = 2.4 [95% CI = 1.5–3.9]), and less mindful eating (β = −0.6, [95% CI = −0.8, −0.3]); being attacked, beaten, or mugged was most associated with less intuitive eating (β = −0.5, [95% CI = −0.8, −0.2]). Among men, being attacked, beaten, or mugged was strongly associated with more overeating (PR = 2.1 [95% CI = 1.2–3.5]) and binge eating (PR = 3.2 [95% CI = 1.6–6.5]); intimate partner physical violence was strongly associated with less intuitive eating (β = −0.6, [95% CI = −0.9, −0.2]); childhood emotional abuse was strongly associated with less mindful eating (β = −0.8, [95% CI = −1.0, −0.5]). To improve eating behaviors, adverse life experiences and the potential impact on maladaptive and adaptive eating should be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number105737
JournalAppetite
Volume168
Early online dateOct 7 2021
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - Oct 7 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Data collection for the study was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (PI: Dianne Neumark-Sztainer) [grant numbers R01HL127077 and R35HL139853 ]. Cynthia Yoon's time was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (PI: Robert W. Jeffery) [award number T32DK083250 ]. Rebecca Emery's time was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (PI: Fulkerson) [ TL1 R002493 ] and (PI: Blazar) [ UL1 TR002494 ]. Vivienne Hazzard's time was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health (PI: Scott Crow) [award Number T32MH082761 ]. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institute of Mental Health, or the National Institutes of Health.

Funding Information:
Data collection for the study was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (PI: Dianne Neumark-Sztainer) [grant numbers R01HL127077 and R35HL139853]. Cynthia Yoon's time was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (PI: Robert W. Jeffery) [award number T32DK083250]. Rebecca Emery's time was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (PI: Fulkerson) [TL1 R002493] and (PI: Blazar) [UL1 TR002494]. Vivienne Hazzard's time was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health (PI: Scott Crow) [award Number T32MH082761]. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institute of Mental Health, or the National Institutes of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021

Keywords

  • Adverse childhood experience
  • Binge eating
  • Interpersonal violence
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Intuitive eating
  • Mindful eating

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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