Advanced brain age in deployment-related traumatic brain injury: A LIMBIC-CENC neuroimaging study

Emily L. Dennis, Brian A. Taylor, Mary R. Newsome, Maya Troyanskaya, Tracy J. Abildskov, Aaron M. Betts, Erin D. Bigler, James Cole, Nicholas Davenport, Timothy Duncan, Jessica Gill, Vivian Guedes, Sidney R. Hinds, Elizabeth S. Hovenden, Kimbra Kenney, Mary Jo Pugh, Randall S. Scheibel, Pashtun Poh Shahim, Robert Shih, William C. WalkerJ. Kent Werner, Gerald E. York, David X. Cifu, David F. Tate, Elisabeth A. Wilde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To determine if history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is associated with advanced or accelerated brain aging among the United States (US) military Service Members and Veterans. Methods: Eight hundred and twenty-two participants (mean age = 40.4 years, 714 male/108 female) underwent MRI sessions at eight sites across the US. Two hundred and one participants completed a follow-up scan between five months and four years later. Predicted brain ages were calculated using T1-weighted MRIs and then compared with chronological ages to generate an Age Deviation Score for cross-sectional analyses and an Interval Deviation Score for longitudinal analyses. Participants also completed a neuropsychological battery, including measures of both cognitive functioning and psychological health. Result: In cross-sectional analyses, males with a history of deployment-related mTBI showed advanced brain age compared to those without (t(884) = 2.1, p = .038), while this association was not significant in females. In follow-up analyses of the male participants, severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression symptoms, and alcohol misuse were also associated with advanced brain age. Conclusion: History of deployment-related mTBI, severity of PTSD and depression symptoms, and alcohol misuse are associated with advanced brain aging in male US military Service Members and Veterans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)662-672
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Injury
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs endorsed by the Department of Defense, through the Psychological Health/Traumatic Brain Injury Research Program LongTerm Impact of Military Relevant Brain Injury Consortium (LIMBIC) Award W81XWH18PH/TBIRPLIMBIC under Awards No. W81XWH1920067 and W81XWH1320095, and by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Awards No. I01 CX002097, I01 CX002096, I01 HX003155, I01 RX003444, I01 RX003443, I01 RX003442, I01 CX001135, I01 CX001246, I01 RX001774, I01 RX 001135, I01 RX 002076, I01 RX 001880, I01 RX 002172, I01 RX 002173,

Funding Information:
I01 RX 002171, I01 RX 002174, and I01 RX 002170. The U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity, 839 Chandler Street, Fort Detrick MD 217025014 is the awarding and administering acquisition office. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the author and are not necessarily endorsed by the Department of Defense or the Department of Veterans Affairs. This work is also supported in part by R61NS120249 to ELD, DFT, and EAW, I01CX001820 to RSS and VA Health Services Research IK6HX002608 to MJP.

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Department of Biotechnology, Ministry of Science and Technology [W81XWH-18-PH/TBIRP-LIMBIC]; Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, NEU [R61NS120249]; Medical Research and Materiel Command [1I01CX002097-01, I01CX001820]. This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs endorsed by the Department of Defense, through the Psychological Health/Traumatic Brain Injury Research Program LongTerm Impact of Military Relevant Brain Injury Consortium (LIMBIC) Award W81XWH18PH/TBIRPLIMBIC under Awards No. W81XWH1920067 and W81XWH1320095, and by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Awards No. I01 CX002097, I01 CX002096, I01 HX003155, I01 RX003444, I01 RX003443, I01 RX003442, I01 CX001135, I01 CX001246, I01 RX001774, I01 RX 001135, I01 RX 002076, I01 RX 001880, I01 RX 002172, I01 RX 002173, I01 RX 002171, I01 RX 002174, and I01 RX 002170. The U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity, 839 Chandler Street, Fort Detrick MD 217025014 is the awarding and administering acquisition office. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the author and are not necessarily endorsed by the Department of Defense or the Department of Veterans Affairs. This work is also supported in part by R61NS120249 to ELD, DFT, and EAW, I01CX001820 to RSS and VA Health Services Research IK6HX002608 to MJP.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • MRI
  • TBI
  • aging
  • mild brain injury
  • neuroimaging
  • Neuroimaging
  • Brain
  • Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnostic imaging
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • United States
  • Alcoholism
  • Humans
  • Veterans/psychology
  • Male
  • Military Personnel/psychology
  • Brain Concussion/psychology
  • Brain Injuries, Traumatic/complications
  • Adult
  • Female

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

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