Adults' Autonomic and Subjective Emotional Responses to Infant Vocalizations: The Role of Secure Base Script Knowledge

Ashley M. Groh, Glenn I. Roisman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

69 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article examines the extent to which secure base script knowledge-as reflected in an adult's ability to generate narratives in which attachment-related threats are recognized, competent help is provided, and the problem is resolved-is associated with adults' autonomic and subjective emotional responses to infant distress and nondistress vocalizations. Adults who demonstrated low levels of secure base knowledge showed greater electrodermal reactivity and stronger declines in their feelings of love while they listened to a recording of an infant crying. In contrast, secure base knowledge was not significantly associated with adults' responses to infant laughter. Results are discussed in terms of their role in extending prior research on the psychophysiology of adult attachment and their possible implications for the intergenerational transmission of attachment-related experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)889-893
Number of pages5
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Attachment Script Assessment
  • electrodermal activity
  • heart rate reactivity
  • infant crying
  • infant laughter

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