Adult resilience after child abuse

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Growing evidence links adverse childhood experiences to health problems decades later. A study of adults followed in midlife finds that perceived social support predicts lower subsequent mortality, particularly for adults reporting child abuse, suggesting that supportive relationships buffer long-term health in the context of early maltreatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)244-245
Number of pages2
JournalNature Human Behaviour
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

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Child Abuse
Health
Social Support
Buffers
Mortality

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Comment

Cite this

Adult resilience after child abuse. / Masten, Ann S.

In: Nature Human Behaviour, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 244-245.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Masten, Ann S. / Adult resilience after child abuse. In: Nature Human Behaviour. 2018 ; Vol. 2, No. 4. pp. 244-245.
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