Adult cigarette smokers at highest risk for concurrent alternative tobacco product use among a racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample

Nicole L. Nollen, Jasjit S. Ahluwalia, Yang Lei, Qing Yu, Taneisha S. Scheuermann, Matthew S. Mayo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Rates of alternative tobacco product use (ATPs; eg, cigars, cigarillos, pipes) among cigarette smokers are on the rise but little is known about the subgroups at highest risk. This study explored interactions between demographic, tobacco, and psychosocial factors to identify cigarette smokers at highest risk for ATP use from a racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of adult smokers across the full smoking spectrum (nondaily, daily light, daily heavy). Methods: Two-thousand three-hundred seventy-six adult cigarette smokers participated in an online cross-sectional survey. Quotas ensured equal recruitment of African American (AA), white (W), Hispanic/Latino (H) as well as daily and nondaily smokers. Classification and Regression Tree modeling was used to identify subgroups of cigarette smokers at highest risk for ATP use. Results: 51.3% were Cig+ATP smokers. Alcohol for men and age, race/ethnicity, and discrimination for women increased the probability of ATP use. Strikingly, 73.5% of men screening positive for moderate to heavy drinking and 62.2% of younger (≤45 years) African American/Hispanic/Latino women who experienced regular discrimination were Cig+ATP smokers. Conclusions: Screening for concurrent ATP use is necessary for the continued success of tobacco cessation efforts especially among male alcohol users and racial/ethnic minority women who are at greatest risk for ATP use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)386-394
Number of pages9
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was funded by Pfizer?s Global Research Awards for Nicotine Dependence (PI: JSA). JSA is also supported in part by the National Institute for Minority Health Disparities (NCMHD/NIH?1P60MD003422). Pfizer had no role in the design and conduct of the study; in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of the data; or in the preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript.

Funding Information:
This work was funded by Pfizer’s Global Research Awards for Nicotine Dependence (PI: JSA). JSA is also supported in part by the National Institute for Minority Health Disparities (NCMHD/NIH—1P60MD003422). Pfizer had no role in the design and conduct of the study; in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of the data; or in the preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript.

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author 2015.

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