Adolescents' attitudes about and consumption of low-fat foods: Associations with sex and weight-control behaviors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of the study was to examine adolescents' attitudes about and consumption of low-fat foods by sex and weight-control behaviors. Ninth- to 12th-grade students (n=1,083) in 20 Minnesota high schools completed mail surveys (response rate=74%) as part of baseline measurements (Fall 2001) in a randomized controlled trial (TACOS: Trying Alternative Cafeteria Options in Schools). Linear models examined attitudes and consumption of low-fat foods by sex and weight-control behaviors. Girls were more likely than boys to report positive attitudes and consumption of low-fat foods (all P<.01). Weight-control practices were associated with more positive attitudes about and higher consumption of low-fat foods. Promoting low-fat snacks to adolescents who are interested in weight control may be an effective component of nutrition intervention programs because these students have more positive attitudes about low-fat foods. Dietitians' efforts to educate adolescents about the benefits and healthfulness of low-fat foods would aid intervention programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-237
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume104
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

low fat foods
Behavior Control
weight control
Fats
Weights and Measures
Food
gender
students
food aid
high schools
Students
nutritional intervention
snacks
dietitians
Snacks
Nutritionists
Postal Service
control methods
linear models
Linear Models

Cite this

@article{8ce449de93f34fc0a1822494137eca1c,
title = "Adolescents' attitudes about and consumption of low-fat foods: Associations with sex and weight-control behaviors",
abstract = "The objective of the study was to examine adolescents' attitudes about and consumption of low-fat foods by sex and weight-control behaviors. Ninth- to 12th-grade students (n=1,083) in 20 Minnesota high schools completed mail surveys (response rate=74{\%}) as part of baseline measurements (Fall 2001) in a randomized controlled trial (TACOS: Trying Alternative Cafeteria Options in Schools). Linear models examined attitudes and consumption of low-fat foods by sex and weight-control behaviors. Girls were more likely than boys to report positive attitudes and consumption of low-fat foods (all P<.01). Weight-control practices were associated with more positive attitudes about and higher consumption of low-fat foods. Promoting low-fat snacks to adolescents who are interested in weight control may be an effective component of nutrition intervention programs because these students have more positive attitudes about low-fat foods. Dietitians' efforts to educate adolescents about the benefits and healthfulness of low-fat foods would aid intervention programs.",
author = "Jayne Fulkerson and French, {Simone A} and Story, {Mary T}",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jada.2003.09.022",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "104",
pages = "233--237",
journal = "Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics",
issn = "2212-2672",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adolescents' attitudes about and consumption of low-fat foods

T2 - Associations with sex and weight-control behaviors

AU - Fulkerson, Jayne

AU - French, Simone A

AU - Story, Mary T

PY - 2004/1/1

Y1 - 2004/1/1

N2 - The objective of the study was to examine adolescents' attitudes about and consumption of low-fat foods by sex and weight-control behaviors. Ninth- to 12th-grade students (n=1,083) in 20 Minnesota high schools completed mail surveys (response rate=74%) as part of baseline measurements (Fall 2001) in a randomized controlled trial (TACOS: Trying Alternative Cafeteria Options in Schools). Linear models examined attitudes and consumption of low-fat foods by sex and weight-control behaviors. Girls were more likely than boys to report positive attitudes and consumption of low-fat foods (all P<.01). Weight-control practices were associated with more positive attitudes about and higher consumption of low-fat foods. Promoting low-fat snacks to adolescents who are interested in weight control may be an effective component of nutrition intervention programs because these students have more positive attitudes about low-fat foods. Dietitians' efforts to educate adolescents about the benefits and healthfulness of low-fat foods would aid intervention programs.

AB - The objective of the study was to examine adolescents' attitudes about and consumption of low-fat foods by sex and weight-control behaviors. Ninth- to 12th-grade students (n=1,083) in 20 Minnesota high schools completed mail surveys (response rate=74%) as part of baseline measurements (Fall 2001) in a randomized controlled trial (TACOS: Trying Alternative Cafeteria Options in Schools). Linear models examined attitudes and consumption of low-fat foods by sex and weight-control behaviors. Girls were more likely than boys to report positive attitudes and consumption of low-fat foods (all P<.01). Weight-control practices were associated with more positive attitudes about and higher consumption of low-fat foods. Promoting low-fat snacks to adolescents who are interested in weight control may be an effective component of nutrition intervention programs because these students have more positive attitudes about low-fat foods. Dietitians' efforts to educate adolescents about the benefits and healthfulness of low-fat foods would aid intervention programs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0842332088&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0842332088&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jada.2003.09.022

DO - 10.1016/j.jada.2003.09.022

M3 - Article

C2 - 14760572

AN - SCOPUS:0842332088

VL - 104

SP - 233

EP - 237

JO - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

JF - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

SN - 2212-2672

IS - 2

ER -