Adolescent use of complementary therapies

Carie A. Braun, Linda H Bearinger, Linda L. Halcón, Sandra L Pettingell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Interest in alternative/complementary therapies (A/CTs) is on the rise, yet little is known about adolescents' use of A/CTs. The study purpose was to examine A/CT utilization patterns among a clinic-based sample of adolescents. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 401 adolescents, aged 12-18 years, was conducted in one Midwest urban adolescent ambulatory clinic in 2002. Results: Overall, 68.1% of the adolescents reported using one or more A/CT; most commonly, herbal medicines (27.2%), massage therapy (26.7%), and megavitamins (21.7%). Use by friends and family was the primary influence for adolescent A/CT use; lack of familiarity was the greatest reason for nonuse (53.9%). Alleviation of physical pain (66.3%) was the most common desired health outcome. Few adolescents (13.8%) disclosed A/CT use to their health care providers. Insurance coverage was provided for 10.2% of the therapies and out-of-pocket costs averaged $67/month. Age, race/ethnicity, having a health condition, taking medications, health responsibility, and work status were associated with overall A/CT use in bivariate analyses. Of these, only associations between A/CT use and race/ethnicity and health responsibility remained statistically significant after adjusting for the other variables. Conclusions: Use of A/CTs was common among these adolescents, yet very few disclosed their use to health care providers. Providers must ask about A/CT use to gain a more complete understanding of health practices among adolescents in clinical settings. Future research is needed to better understand representative patterns of A/CT use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Complementary Therapies
Health
Health Personnel
Insurance Coverage
Massage
Herbal Medicine

Keywords

  • Adolescent health
  • Alternative medicine
  • Complementary therapies

Cite this

Adolescent use of complementary therapies. / Braun, Carie A.; Bearinger, Linda H; Halcón, Linda L.; Pettingell, Sandra L.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.01.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Braun, Carie A. ; Bearinger, Linda H ; Halcón, Linda L. ; Pettingell, Sandra L. / Adolescent use of complementary therapies. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2005 ; Vol. 37, No. 1.
@article{cc766077c02946d2b4314b6cd6ed9456,
title = "Adolescent use of complementary therapies",
abstract = "Purpose: Interest in alternative/complementary therapies (A/CTs) is on the rise, yet little is known about adolescents' use of A/CTs. The study purpose was to examine A/CT utilization patterns among a clinic-based sample of adolescents. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 401 adolescents, aged 12-18 years, was conducted in one Midwest urban adolescent ambulatory clinic in 2002. Results: Overall, 68.1{\%} of the adolescents reported using one or more A/CT; most commonly, herbal medicines (27.2{\%}), massage therapy (26.7{\%}), and megavitamins (21.7{\%}). Use by friends and family was the primary influence for adolescent A/CT use; lack of familiarity was the greatest reason for nonuse (53.9{\%}). Alleviation of physical pain (66.3{\%}) was the most common desired health outcome. Few adolescents (13.8{\%}) disclosed A/CT use to their health care providers. Insurance coverage was provided for 10.2{\%} of the therapies and out-of-pocket costs averaged $67/month. Age, race/ethnicity, having a health condition, taking medications, health responsibility, and work status were associated with overall A/CT use in bivariate analyses. Of these, only associations between A/CT use and race/ethnicity and health responsibility remained statistically significant after adjusting for the other variables. Conclusions: Use of A/CTs was common among these adolescents, yet very few disclosed their use to health care providers. Providers must ask about A/CT use to gain a more complete understanding of health practices among adolescents in clinical settings. Future research is needed to better understand representative patterns of A/CT use.",
keywords = "Adolescent health, Alternative medicine, Complementary therapies",
author = "Braun, {Carie A.} and Bearinger, {Linda H} and Halc{\'o}n, {Linda L.} and Pettingell, {Sandra L}",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jadohealth.2004.07.010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adolescent use of complementary therapies

AU - Braun, Carie A.

AU - Bearinger, Linda H

AU - Halcón, Linda L.

AU - Pettingell, Sandra L

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - Purpose: Interest in alternative/complementary therapies (A/CTs) is on the rise, yet little is known about adolescents' use of A/CTs. The study purpose was to examine A/CT utilization patterns among a clinic-based sample of adolescents. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 401 adolescents, aged 12-18 years, was conducted in one Midwest urban adolescent ambulatory clinic in 2002. Results: Overall, 68.1% of the adolescents reported using one or more A/CT; most commonly, herbal medicines (27.2%), massage therapy (26.7%), and megavitamins (21.7%). Use by friends and family was the primary influence for adolescent A/CT use; lack of familiarity was the greatest reason for nonuse (53.9%). Alleviation of physical pain (66.3%) was the most common desired health outcome. Few adolescents (13.8%) disclosed A/CT use to their health care providers. Insurance coverage was provided for 10.2% of the therapies and out-of-pocket costs averaged $67/month. Age, race/ethnicity, having a health condition, taking medications, health responsibility, and work status were associated with overall A/CT use in bivariate analyses. Of these, only associations between A/CT use and race/ethnicity and health responsibility remained statistically significant after adjusting for the other variables. Conclusions: Use of A/CTs was common among these adolescents, yet very few disclosed their use to health care providers. Providers must ask about A/CT use to gain a more complete understanding of health practices among adolescents in clinical settings. Future research is needed to better understand representative patterns of A/CT use.

AB - Purpose: Interest in alternative/complementary therapies (A/CTs) is on the rise, yet little is known about adolescents' use of A/CTs. The study purpose was to examine A/CT utilization patterns among a clinic-based sample of adolescents. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 401 adolescents, aged 12-18 years, was conducted in one Midwest urban adolescent ambulatory clinic in 2002. Results: Overall, 68.1% of the adolescents reported using one or more A/CT; most commonly, herbal medicines (27.2%), massage therapy (26.7%), and megavitamins (21.7%). Use by friends and family was the primary influence for adolescent A/CT use; lack of familiarity was the greatest reason for nonuse (53.9%). Alleviation of physical pain (66.3%) was the most common desired health outcome. Few adolescents (13.8%) disclosed A/CT use to their health care providers. Insurance coverage was provided for 10.2% of the therapies and out-of-pocket costs averaged $67/month. Age, race/ethnicity, having a health condition, taking medications, health responsibility, and work status were associated with overall A/CT use in bivariate analyses. Of these, only associations between A/CT use and race/ethnicity and health responsibility remained statistically significant after adjusting for the other variables. Conclusions: Use of A/CTs was common among these adolescents, yet very few disclosed their use to health care providers. Providers must ask about A/CT use to gain a more complete understanding of health practices among adolescents in clinical settings. Future research is needed to better understand representative patterns of A/CT use.

KW - Adolescent health

KW - Alternative medicine

KW - Complementary therapies

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=20444499284&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=20444499284&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2004.07.010

DO - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2004.07.010

M3 - Article

VL - 37

JO - Journal of Adolescent Health

JF - Journal of Adolescent Health

SN - 1054-139X

IS - 1

ER -