Adolescent Consumption of Sports and Energy Drinks: Linkages to Higher Physical Activity, Unhealthy Beverage Patterns, Cigarette Smoking, and Screen Media Use

Nicole Larson, Jessica DeWolfe, Mary Story, Dianne Neumark-Sztainer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine patterns of adolescent sports and energy drink (SED) consumption and identify behavioral correlates. Design: Data were drawn from Eating and Activity in Teens, a population-based study. Setting: Adolescents from 20 middle and high schools in Minneapolis/St Paul, MN completed classroom-administered surveys. Participants: A total of 2,793 adolescents (53.2% girls) in grades 6-12. Variables Measured: Beverage patterns; breakfast frequency; moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA); media use; sleep; and cigarette smoking. Analysis: Linear and logistic regression models were used to estimate associations between health behaviors and SED consumption, adjusting for demographics. Results: Over a third of adolescents consumed sports drinks and 14.7% consumed energy drinks at least once a week. Among boys and girls, both sports and energy drink consumption were related to higher video game use; sugar-sweetened beverage and fruit juice intake; and smoking (P <.05). Sports drink consumption was also significantly related to higher MVPA and organized sport participation for both genders (P <.01). Conclusions and Implications: Although sports drink consumption was associated with higher MVPA, adolescents should be reminded of recommendations to consume these beverages only after vigorous, prolonged activity. There is also a need for future interventions designed to reduce SED consumption, to address the clustering of unhealthy behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-187
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Energy Drinks
Beverages
Sports
Smoking
Exercise
Logistic Models
Video Games
Breakfast
Health Behavior
Cluster Analysis
Youth Sports
Linear Models
Sleep
Eating
Demography

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Dietary intake
  • Energy drinks
  • Physical activity
  • Sleep patterns
  • Sports drinks

Cite this

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title = "Adolescent Consumption of Sports and Energy Drinks: Linkages to Higher Physical Activity, Unhealthy Beverage Patterns, Cigarette Smoking, and Screen Media Use",
abstract = "Objective: To examine patterns of adolescent sports and energy drink (SED) consumption and identify behavioral correlates. Design: Data were drawn from Eating and Activity in Teens, a population-based study. Setting: Adolescents from 20 middle and high schools in Minneapolis/St Paul, MN completed classroom-administered surveys. Participants: A total of 2,793 adolescents (53.2{\%} girls) in grades 6-12. Variables Measured: Beverage patterns; breakfast frequency; moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA); media use; sleep; and cigarette smoking. Analysis: Linear and logistic regression models were used to estimate associations between health behaviors and SED consumption, adjusting for demographics. Results: Over a third of adolescents consumed sports drinks and 14.7{\%} consumed energy drinks at least once a week. Among boys and girls, both sports and energy drink consumption were related to higher video game use; sugar-sweetened beverage and fruit juice intake; and smoking (P <.05). Sports drink consumption was also significantly related to higher MVPA and organized sport participation for both genders (P <.01). Conclusions and Implications: Although sports drink consumption was associated with higher MVPA, adolescents should be reminded of recommendations to consume these beverages only after vigorous, prolonged activity. There is also a need for future interventions designed to reduce SED consumption, to address the clustering of unhealthy behaviors.",
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