Adiponectin and catecholamine concentrations during acute exercise in children with type 1 diabetes

Nelly Mauras, Kraig Kollman, Michael W. Steffes, Ravinder Singh, Rosanna Fiallo-Scharer, Eva Tsalikian, Stuart A. Weinzimer, Bruce Buckingham, Roy W. Beck, Katrina J. Ruedy, Dongyuan Xing, William V. Tamborlane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Adiponectin, an adipokine secreted by the adipocyte, is inversely related to adiposity and directly related to insulin sensitivity. In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), however, data thus far are contradictory. We investigated the relationship between adiponectin and exercise inT1DM. Methods: Forty-nine children (14.5 ± 2.0 yr, range 8-17 yr) with T1DM on an insulin pump were studied during two 75-min exercise sessions with and without continuation of the basal rate within 4 wk. Adiponectin and epinephrine concentrations were measured before and during exercise. Results: Mean preexercise adiponectin concentration was 11.2 ± 4.7 mg/L (range 2.7-23.0 mg/L) with a mean absolute difference of 1.7 mg/L between the 2d. Adiponectin concentrations did not change meaningfully during exercise (mean change: -0.1±1.2mg/L; p = 0.17). Adiponectin correlated inversely with body mass index percentile (p = 0.02) but not with age, gender, duration of diabetes, hemoglobin A1c, or preexercise glucose. However, those with higher baseline adiponectin concentrations were less likely to become hypoglycemic during exercise, 36% becoming hypoglycemic when baseline adiponectin concentration was <10mg/L, 42% when 10 to <15 mg/L, and 15% when ≥15 mg/L (p = 0.02). Baseline epinephrine concentrations were not associated with adiponectin, and in those whose nadir glucose was ≤100 mg/dL, there was no correlation between epinephrine response and adiponectin (p = 0.16). Conclusions: Adiponectin concentrations are stable from day to day, are not affected by acute exercise or metabolic control, and vary inversely with adiposity. Higher adiponectin concentration appears to be associated with a decrease in hypoglycemia risk during exercise. Further studies are needed to examine whether adiponectin protects against exercise-induced hypoglycemia by directly enhancing the oxidation of alternate fuels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-227
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Diabetes
Volume9
Issue number3 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008

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Adiponectin
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Catecholamines
Exercise
Epinephrine
Adiposity
Hypoglycemia
Hypoglycemic Agents
Glucose
Adipokines
Adipocytes
Insulin Resistance
Hemoglobins
Body Mass Index

Keywords

  • Adiponectin
  • Exercise
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Insulin pump
  • T1DM

Cite this

Mauras, N., Kollman, K., Steffes, M. W., Singh, R., Fiallo-Scharer, R., Tsalikian, E., ... Tamborlane, W. V. (2008). Adiponectin and catecholamine concentrations during acute exercise in children with type 1 diabetes. Pediatric Diabetes, 9(3 PART 1), 221-227. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-5448.2008.00372.x

Adiponectin and catecholamine concentrations during acute exercise in children with type 1 diabetes. / Mauras, Nelly; Kollman, Kraig; Steffes, Michael W.; Singh, Ravinder; Fiallo-Scharer, Rosanna; Tsalikian, Eva; Weinzimer, Stuart A.; Buckingham, Bruce; Beck, Roy W.; Ruedy, Katrina J.; Xing, Dongyuan; Tamborlane, William V.

In: Pediatric Diabetes, Vol. 9, No. 3 PART 1, 01.06.2008, p. 221-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mauras, N, Kollman, K, Steffes, MW, Singh, R, Fiallo-Scharer, R, Tsalikian, E, Weinzimer, SA, Buckingham, B, Beck, RW, Ruedy, KJ, Xing, D & Tamborlane, WV 2008, 'Adiponectin and catecholamine concentrations during acute exercise in children with type 1 diabetes', Pediatric Diabetes, vol. 9, no. 3 PART 1, pp. 221-227. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-5448.2008.00372.x
Mauras, Nelly ; Kollman, Kraig ; Steffes, Michael W. ; Singh, Ravinder ; Fiallo-Scharer, Rosanna ; Tsalikian, Eva ; Weinzimer, Stuart A. ; Buckingham, Bruce ; Beck, Roy W. ; Ruedy, Katrina J. ; Xing, Dongyuan ; Tamborlane, William V. / Adiponectin and catecholamine concentrations during acute exercise in children with type 1 diabetes. In: Pediatric Diabetes. 2008 ; Vol. 9, No. 3 PART 1. pp. 221-227.
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abstract = "Objective: Adiponectin, an adipokine secreted by the adipocyte, is inversely related to adiposity and directly related to insulin sensitivity. In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), however, data thus far are contradictory. We investigated the relationship between adiponectin and exercise inT1DM. Methods: Forty-nine children (14.5 ± 2.0 yr, range 8-17 yr) with T1DM on an insulin pump were studied during two 75-min exercise sessions with and without continuation of the basal rate within 4 wk. Adiponectin and epinephrine concentrations were measured before and during exercise. Results: Mean preexercise adiponectin concentration was 11.2 ± 4.7 mg/L (range 2.7-23.0 mg/L) with a mean absolute difference of 1.7 mg/L between the 2d. Adiponectin concentrations did not change meaningfully during exercise (mean change: -0.1±1.2mg/L; p = 0.17). Adiponectin correlated inversely with body mass index percentile (p = 0.02) but not with age, gender, duration of diabetes, hemoglobin A1c, or preexercise glucose. However, those with higher baseline adiponectin concentrations were less likely to become hypoglycemic during exercise, 36{\%} becoming hypoglycemic when baseline adiponectin concentration was <10mg/L, 42{\%} when 10 to <15 mg/L, and 15{\%} when ≥15 mg/L (p = 0.02). Baseline epinephrine concentrations were not associated with adiponectin, and in those whose nadir glucose was ≤100 mg/dL, there was no correlation between epinephrine response and adiponectin (p = 0.16). Conclusions: Adiponectin concentrations are stable from day to day, are not affected by acute exercise or metabolic control, and vary inversely with adiposity. Higher adiponectin concentration appears to be associated with a decrease in hypoglycemia risk during exercise. Further studies are needed to examine whether adiponectin protects against exercise-induced hypoglycemia by directly enhancing the oxidation of alternate fuels.",
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AU - Tsalikian, Eva

AU - Weinzimer, Stuart A.

AU - Buckingham, Bruce

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