Adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of a mutant endostatin in combination with carboplatin treatment inhibits orthotopic growth of ovarian cancer and improves long-term survival

Indira V. Subramanian, Tri Minh Bui Nguyen, Alexander M. Truskinovsky, Jakub Tolar, Bruce R. Blazar, Sundaram Ramakrishnan

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36 Scopus citations

Abstract

A human ovarian cancer cell line, which migrates to mouse ovaries and establishes peritoneal carcinomatosis, was used to evaluate the cooperative effect of an antiangiogenic gene therapy combined with chemotherapy. The ovarian carcinoma cell line MA148 was genetically modified by "Sleeping Beauty" transposon-mediated delivery of DsRed2 fluorescent protein. Stable, high-level expression of DsRed protein enabled in vivo imaging of peritoneal dissemination of ovarian cancer. Both external and internal imaging, along with histopathology, showed migration of i.p. injected human ovarian cancer cell line to mouse ovaries. Using this model, we evaluated the effect of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated expression of a mutant endostatin either alone or in combination with carboplatin treatment. A single i.m. injection of recombinant AAV (rAAV)-mutant human endostatin with P125A substitution (P125A-endostatin) showed sustained expression of mutant endostatin. Antiangiogenic gene therapy inhibited orthotopic growth of ovarian cancer and resulted in 33% long-term tumor-free survival. A single cycle of carboplatin treatment combined with mutant endostatin gene therapy resulted in 60% of the animals remaining tumor free for >200 days, which was significantly better than rAAV-LacZ and/or carboplatin. Combination treatment delayed tumor appearance in 40% of the animals, wherein the residual tumors were smaller in size with limited or no peritoneal metastasis. These studies suggest that AAV-mediated gene therapy of P125A-endostatin in combination with carboplatin is a useful method to inhibit peritoneal dissemination of ovarian carcinoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4319-4328
Number of pages10
JournalCancer Research
Volume66
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2006

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