Added sugar intake is associated with pericardial adipose tissue volume

So Yun Yi, Lyn M. Steffen, James G. Terry, David R Jacobs, Daniel Duprez, Brian Steffen, Xia Zhou, James M. Shikany, Lisa Harnack, John J Carr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

AIM: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships of pericardial adipose tissue and visceral adipose tissue volume with added sugar and sugar-sweetened beverage intakes. We hypothesized that both added sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages were positively associated with pericardial adipose tissue and visceral adipose tissue volumes in black and white men and women enrolled in the prospective Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Dietary intake was assessed by diet history at baseline, year 7 and year 20 examinations in 3070 participants aged 18-30 and generally healthy at baseline. After 25 years follow-up, participants underwent a computed tomography scan of chest and abdomen; the computed tomography scans were read, and pericardial adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes were calculated. Quintiles were created for the average of baseline, year 7 and year 20 added sugar and for the average of sugar-sweetened beverages. General linear regression analysis evaluated the associations of pericardial adipose tissue and visceral adipose tissue volumes across quintiles of added sugar and across quintiles of sugar-sweetened beverage intakes adjusted for potential confounding factors. In a multivariable model, pericardial adipose tissue volume was higher across increasing quintiles of added sugar and sugar-sweetened beverage intakes ( p trend  = 0.001 and p trend  < 0.001, respectively). A similar relation was observed for visceral adipose tissue ( p trend  < 0.001 for both added sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages).

CONCLUSIONS: Long-term intakes of added sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages were associated with higher pericardial adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes. Because these ectopic fat depots are associated with greater risk of disease incidence, these findings support limiting intakes of added sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2016-2023
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Preventive Cardiology
Volume27
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors thank the investigators, the staff and the participants of the CARDIA study for their dedication and highly valued contributions. This article has been reviewed prior to submission by CARDIA for scientific content. The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This work was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health (grants R21 HL135300 to LMS and R01-HL098445 to JJC, and contracts HHSN268201800003I, HHSN268201800004I, HHSN268201800005I, HHSN268201800006I, and HHSN268201800007I).

Publisher Copyright:
© The European Society of Cardiology 2020.

Keywords

  • Added sugar
  • ectopic fat
  • epidemiology
  • pericardial adipose tissue
  • sugar-sweetened beverages

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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