Adaptive Recruitment and Parenting Interventions for Immigrant Latino Families with Adolescents

Diego Garcia-Huidobro, Maria O. Diaspro-Higuera, Dora Palma, Roberto Palma, Luis Ortega, Rebecca J Shlafer, Elizabeth Wieling, Timothy F Piehler, Gerald August, Maria V. Svetaz, Iris W Borowsky, Michele L Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parenting programs are an effective strategy to prevent multiple risky outcomes during adolescence. However, these programs usually enroll one caregiver and have low attendance. This study evaluated the preliminary results, cost, and satisfaction of adaptive recruitment and parenting interventions for immigrant Latino families. A mixed methods study was conducted integrating a pre-post design with embedded qualitative and process evaluations. Fifteen immigrant Latino families with an adolescent child aged 10–14 were recruited. Two-caregiver families received a home visit to increase enrollment of both caregivers. All families participated in an adaptive parenting program that included group sessions and a one-to-one component (online videos plus follow-up telephone calls) for those who did not attend the group sessions. The intervention addressed positive parenting practices using a strengths-based framework. Primary outcomes were the proportion of two-parent families recruited and intervention participation. Secondary outcomes were change in parenting self-efficacy, practices, fidelity, costs, and satisfaction. Participants completed questionnaires and interaction tasks before and after participating in the intervention. In addition, participants and program facilitators completed individual interviews to assess satisfaction with the program components. Overall, 23 parents participated in the intervention; 73% of two-parent families enrolled with both parents. Most participants completed 75% or more of the intervention. Fathers were more likely to use the one-to-one component of the intervention than mothers (p =.038). Participants were satisfied with program modifications. In sum, adaptive recruitment and parenting interventions achieved high father enrollment and high participation. These findings warrant further evaluation in randomized trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-67
Number of pages12
JournalPrevention Science
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2019

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Parenting
Hispanic Americans
Caregivers
Fathers
Parents
Costs and Cost Analysis
House Calls
Self Efficacy
Telephone
Mothers
Interviews

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Latinos
  • Parenting
  • Personalized medicine
  • Prevention

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Adaptive Recruitment and Parenting Interventions for Immigrant Latino Families with Adolescents. / Garcia-Huidobro, Diego; Diaspro-Higuera, Maria O.; Palma, Dora; Palma, Roberto; Ortega, Luis; Shlafer, Rebecca J; Wieling, Elizabeth; Piehler, Timothy F; August, Gerald; Svetaz, Maria V.; Borowsky, Iris W; Allen, Michele L.

In: Prevention Science, Vol. 20, No. 1, 15.01.2019, p. 56-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garcia-Huidobro, Diego ; Diaspro-Higuera, Maria O. ; Palma, Dora ; Palma, Roberto ; Ortega, Luis ; Shlafer, Rebecca J ; Wieling, Elizabeth ; Piehler, Timothy F ; August, Gerald ; Svetaz, Maria V. ; Borowsky, Iris W ; Allen, Michele L. / Adaptive Recruitment and Parenting Interventions for Immigrant Latino Families with Adolescents. In: Prevention Science. 2019 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 56-67.
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