Acute, unilateral transverse sinus occlusion during craniectomy in seven dogs with space-occupying intracranial disease

Rodney S. Bagley, Michael L. Harrington, G. Elizabeth Pluhar, Patrick R. Gavin, Michael P. Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective- The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of acute, unilateral transverse sinus occlusion on intracranial pressure (ICP) and postoperative mortality in dogs with structural intracranial disease. Study Design- Affected dogs had a single transverse sinus occluded during craniectomy for intracranial mass biopsy or removal. Animals- Seven dogs with space-occupying intracranial disease in the cerebellopontine angle area. Methods- The ipsilateral transverse sinus was permanently occluded during the surgical approach to the intracranial lesion to increase surgical exposure by allowing a caudal lateral rostrotentorial craniectomy to be combined with a suboccipital craniectomy. In five dogs, intracranial pressure was monitored during surgery using a fiberoptic intracranial pressure monitoring device. Results- Initial ICP varied among dogs, ranging from 7 to 21 mm Hg. Intracranial pressure, however, decreased in all dogs after craniectomy and durotomy (P < .05). No increase in intracranial pressure occurred after transverse sinus occlusion (P = .42). All dogs survived the surgical procedure. Conclusions- Acute, unilateral transverse sinus occlusion during craniectomy in dogs with space-occupying intracranial lesions did not result in significant increases in ICP or intraoperative mortality. Clinical Relevance- Acute, unilateral transverse sinus occlusion during craniectomy can be used to increased surgical exposure to the caudal fossa of the brain without increased risk of increasing ICP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-201
Number of pages7
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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