Acidification and starch behaviour during co-fermentation of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and soybean (Glycine max Merr) into gari, an African fermented food

Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa, Edem John Kongor, George Amponsah Annor, Randy Adjonu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Changes in acidification and starch behaviour were investigated during co-fermentation of cassava and soybean into gari, an African fermented product. Non-volatile acidity, pH and starch content were evaluated using standard analytical methods. Starch breakdown and pasting characteristics were also analysed using a Brabender viscoamylograph. Fermentation caused significant variations in the pH, non-volatile acidity and starch concentration. The pH decreased with concomitant increases in non-volatile acidity during co-fermentation of the cassava dough. Soy fortification up to 20% caused only minimal effects on the pH, titratable acidity and starch content during the fermentation period. Starch content decreased from 69.8% to 60.4% within the 48 h fermentation time in the unfortified sample, with similar trends noted at all levels of fortification. Starch pasting characteristics showed varied trends in pasting temperature, peak viscosity, viscosity at 95°C and at 50°C-hold with increasing fermentation time and soybean concentration. Cassava could be co-fermented with soybean up to 20% concentration during gari processing without significant effect on its process and product quality characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)449-462
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition
Volume61
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright:
Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Fortification
  • Souring
  • acidification
  • cassava
  • fermentation
  • gari
  • rheology
  • soybean
  • starch

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