Accuracy of daily fluid intake measurements using a “smart” water bottle

Michael S. Borofsky, Casey A. Dauw, Nadya York, Colin Terry, James E. Lingeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High fluid intake is an effective preventative strategy against recurrent kidney stones but is known to be challenging to achieve. Recently, a smart water bottle (Hidrate Spark™, Minneapolis, MN) was developed as a non-invasive fluid intake monitoring system. This device could help patients who form stones from low urine volume achieve sustainable improvements in hydration, but has yet to be validated in a clinical setting. Hidrate Spark™ uses capacitive touch sensing via an internal sensor. It calculates volume measurements by detecting changes in water level and sends data wirelessly to users’ smartphones through an application. A pilot study was conducted to assess accuracy of measured fluid intake over 24 h periods when used in a real life setting. Subjects were provided smart bottles and given short tutorials on their use. Accuracy was determined by comparing 24-h fluid intake measurements calculated through the smart bottle via sensor to standard volume measurements calculated by the patient from hand over the same 24 h period. Eight subjects performed sixty-two 24-h measurements (range 4–14). Mean hand measurement was 57.2 oz/1692 mL (21–96 oz/621–2839 mL). Corresponding mean smart bottle measurement underestimated true fluid intake by 0.5 ozs. (95% CI −1.9, 0.9). Percent difference between hand and smart bottle measurements was 0.0% (95% CI − 3%, 3%). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), calculated to assess consistency between hand measures and bottle measures, was 0.97 (0.95, 0.98) indicating an extremely high consistency between measures. 24-h fluid intake measurements from a novel fluid monitoring system (Hidrate Spark™) are accurate to within 3%. Such technology may be useful as a behavioral aide and/or research tool particularly among recurrent stone formers with low urinary volume.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-348
Number of pages6
JournalUrolithiasis
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

Fingerprint

Hand
Water
Patient Handoff
Kidney Calculi
Touch
Urine
Technology
Equipment and Supplies
Research
Smartphone

Keywords

  • Fluid
  • Metabolic stone
  • Mobile health
  • Nephrolithiasis
  • Smartphone
  • Technology
  • Urolithiasis
  • Water

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Evaluation Studies
  • Journal Article

Cite this

Accuracy of daily fluid intake measurements using a “smart” water bottle. / Borofsky, Michael S.; Dauw, Casey A.; York, Nadya; Terry, Colin; Lingeman, James E.

In: Urolithiasis, Vol. 46, No. 4, 01.08.2018, p. 343-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borofsky, Michael S. ; Dauw, Casey A. ; York, Nadya ; Terry, Colin ; Lingeman, James E. / Accuracy of daily fluid intake measurements using a “smart” water bottle. In: Urolithiasis. 2018 ; Vol. 46, No. 4. pp. 343-348.
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