Accumulating Data to Optimally Predict Obesity Treatment (ADOPT) Core Measures: Psychosocial Domain

Angelina R. Sutin, Kerri Boutelle, Susan M. Czajkowski, Elissa S. Epel, Paige A. Green, Christine M. Hunter, Elise L. Rice, David M. Williams, Deborah Young-Hyman, Alexander J. Rothman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Within the Accumulating Data to Optimally Predict obesity Treatment (ADOPT) Core Measures Project, the psychosocial domain addresses how psychosocial processes underlie the influence of obesity treatment strategies on weight loss and weight maintenance. The subgroup for the psychosocial domain identified an initial list of high-priority constructs and measures that ranged from relatively stable characteristics about the person (cognitive function, personality) to dynamic characteristics that may change over time (motivation, affect). Objectives: This paper describes (a) how the psychosocial domain fits into the broader model of weight loss and weight maintenance as conceptualized by ADOPT; (b) the guiding principles used to select constructs and measures for recommendation; (c) the high-priority constructs recommended for inclusion; (d) domain-specific issues for advancing the science; and (e) recommendations for future research. Significance: The inclusion of similar measures across trials will help to better identify how psychosocial factors mediate and moderate the weight loss and weight maintenance process, facilitate research into dynamic interactions with factors in the other ADOPT domains, and ultimately improve the design and delivery of effective interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S45-S54
JournalObesity
Volume26
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

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Obesity
Weight Loss
Maintenance
Weights and Measures
Cognition
Personality
Motivation
Psychology
Research

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

Cite this

Sutin, A. R., Boutelle, K., Czajkowski, S. M., Epel, E. S., Green, P. A., Hunter, C. M., ... Rothman, A. J. (2018). Accumulating Data to Optimally Predict Obesity Treatment (ADOPT) Core Measures: Psychosocial Domain. Obesity, 26, S45-S54. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.22160

Accumulating Data to Optimally Predict Obesity Treatment (ADOPT) Core Measures : Psychosocial Domain. / Sutin, Angelina R.; Boutelle, Kerri; Czajkowski, Susan M.; Epel, Elissa S.; Green, Paige A.; Hunter, Christine M.; Rice, Elise L.; Williams, David M.; Young-Hyman, Deborah; Rothman, Alexander J.

In: Obesity, Vol. 26, 01.04.2018, p. S45-S54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sutin, AR, Boutelle, K, Czajkowski, SM, Epel, ES, Green, PA, Hunter, CM, Rice, EL, Williams, DM, Young-Hyman, D & Rothman, AJ 2018, 'Accumulating Data to Optimally Predict Obesity Treatment (ADOPT) Core Measures: Psychosocial Domain', Obesity, vol. 26, pp. S45-S54. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.22160
Sutin AR, Boutelle K, Czajkowski SM, Epel ES, Green PA, Hunter CM et al. Accumulating Data to Optimally Predict Obesity Treatment (ADOPT) Core Measures: Psychosocial Domain. Obesity. 2018 Apr 1;26:S45-S54. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.22160
Sutin, Angelina R. ; Boutelle, Kerri ; Czajkowski, Susan M. ; Epel, Elissa S. ; Green, Paige A. ; Hunter, Christine M. ; Rice, Elise L. ; Williams, David M. ; Young-Hyman, Deborah ; Rothman, Alexander J. / Accumulating Data to Optimally Predict Obesity Treatment (ADOPT) Core Measures : Psychosocial Domain. In: Obesity. 2018 ; Vol. 26. pp. S45-S54.
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