Access to health insurance at small establishments: What can we learn from analyzing other fringe benefits?

Jean Marie Abraham, Thomas DeLeire, Anne Beeson Royalty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Workers employed at small establishments are less likely to be offered health insurance than workers in larger establishments. They are also paid less and are less likely to be offered pensions, paid sick leave, and paid vacations. Using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, we examine the relationship between health insurance and other components of workers' compensation. We also propose an approach for identifying and prioritizing the reasons why workers in small establishments are less likely to be offered employer health insurance by comparing the provision of health insurance and how it changes with establishment size to the provision of these other fringe benefits and how they change with establishment size. We find that workers in larger establishments are not only more likely to be offered health insurance by their employer, but also are more likely to be offered retirement and paid vacation benefits. The results of our benefits comparison analysis suggest an important role for administrative costs as an obstacle to offering health insurance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-273
Number of pages21
JournalInquiry
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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