A typology of interpartner conflict and maternal parenting practices in high-risk families: Examining spillover and compensatory models and implications for child adjustment

Melissa L. Sturge-Apple, Patrick T. Davies, Dante Cicchetti, Michael G. Fittoria

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study incorporates a person-based approach to identify spillover and compartmentalization patterns of interpartner conflict and maternal parenting practices in an ethnically diverse sample of 192 2-year-old children and their mothers who had experienced higher levels of socioeconomic risk. In addition, we tested whether sociocontextual variables were differentially predictive of theses profiles and examined how interpartner-parenting profiles were associated with children's physiological and psychological adjustment over time. As expected, latent class analyses extracted three primary profiles of functioning: adequate functioning, spillover, and compartmentalizing families. Furthermore, interpartner-parenting profiles were differentially associated with both sociocontextual predictors and children's adjustment trajectories. The findings highlight the developmental utility of incorporating person-based approaches to models of interpartner conflict and maternal parenting practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)983-998
Number of pages16
JournalDevelopment and psychopathology
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 10 2014

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