A time-based intervention to treat impulsivity in male and female rats

Kelsey Panfil, Carrie Bailey, Ian Davis, Anne Mains, Kimberly Kirkpatrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Time-based interventions have emerged as promising treatments for disorders associated with impulsivity. These interventions can be implemented to test their efficacy in preventing or treating impulsive choice in animal models of diseases related to impulsivity such as drug abuse. Impulsive choice is typically defined as choosing a smaller-sooner (SS) reward over a larger-later (LL) reward when the LL is relatively more optimal. Previous research has shown that these interventions promote LL choices in males and females, but sex differences have not been assessed. Because sex differences can complicate the application of therapies, it is critical to compare the effects of the intervention in males and females. The intervention group received exposure to 10-s and 30-s interval schedules, and the control rats received no delay to reward. Different impulsive choice tasks were used to assess the intervention efficacy across the two experiments. Following the intervention, reductions in impulsive choice were found in male and female rats, but the degree of improvement was inconsistent across sex and task. Bayesian analyses that combined the results revealed robust evidence of an overall intervention effect with the intervention group showing greater self-control, but there was no evidence for the intervention affecting males and females differently. Taken together, these results suggest that time-based interventions are effective tools to treat impulsivity in both males and females and offer promising translational capability to humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number112316
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume379
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 3 2020
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by NIMH R01 Grant 085739 and by NIGMS Grant 113109 awarded to Kimberly Kirkpatrick and Kansas State University. Subsets of this data were presented at Society for Quantitative Analyses of Behavior 2018 Annual Conference and Kansas Association for Behavior Analysis 2018 Annual Conference.

Funding Information:
This research was supported by NIMH R01 Grant 085739 and by NIGMS Grant 113109 awarded to Kimberly Kirkpatrick and Kansas State University. Subsets of this data were presented at Society for Quantitative Analyses of Behavior 2018 Annual Conference and Kansas Association for Behavior Analysis 2018 Annual Conference.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Bayesian
  • Female
  • Impulsive choice
  • Intervention
  • Rat

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