A systematic review of US nursing faculty's knowledge, awareness, inclusion, and perceived importance of sexual and gender minority-related content in nursing curricula

Scott Emory Moore, Christopher Lance Coleman, Tonda L. Hughes, Caroline Dorsen, Sheila K. Smith, Kelly M. Bower, John M. Clochesy, Kristen Clark, Athena D.F. Sherman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: In the US, sexual and gender minority (SGM) individuals continue to experience health inequities, and nursing curricula content and nursing faculty with SGM health expertise in the US remain limited. Addressing health disparities begins with the preparation of future nurses—US nursing faculty must be supported to meet these growing needs. Purpose: To describe, appraise, and synthesize research from 2000-2020 on US nursing faculty knowledge, awareness, inclusion, and perceived importance of SGM health content. Methods: Following PRISMA 2020 guidelines, we registered a systematic review and appraisal protocol in PROSPERO, and then executed the protocol and synthesized the literature. Discussion: We found an empirical evidence base surrounding US nursing faculty and SGM health much more limited than expected. Only four cross-sectional, descriptive empirical articles fit the a priori inclusion criteria. The studies were of moderate quality at best and often relied on unvalidated or older measures. In general, the studies focused on examining characteristics of nursing programs, faculty comfort with content, faculty perceptions of content importance, and hours dedicated to content. Conclusion: Since the close of the review, new commentaries and editorials expanding the call for change in the US were published—the time for commentary has passed. It remains unclear whether US nursing faculty are adequately prepared to educate future nurses about SGM health issues—and an unprepared healthcare workforce is yet another barrier to SGM health equity. The evidence base supporting US nursing faculty development desperately needs more studies using rigorous methodologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101950
JournalNursing outlook
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords

  • Curriculum
  • Equity
  • Faculty
  • Health disparities
  • Nursing education
  • Sexual and gender minorities

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Systematic Review
  • Journal Article

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