A subtle source of power: The effect of having an expectation on anticipated interpersonal power

Austin Baldwin, Marc Kiviniemi, Mark Snyder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

In 2 studies, the authors tested the hypothesis that having information about another person can be a source of power in interpersonal interactions. In Study 1, the authors randomized participants to receive an expectation about an interaction partner, and the expectation provided an informational advantage for some participants but not for others. Participants with an advantage reported higher perceptions of power than did those who had information that did not confer an advantage; however, the effect was isolated to feelings of informational power. In Study 2, the authors examined whether the effect extended to different types of power when the information did not provide an explicit advantage. In this case, participants who received a more ambiguous expectation reported more diffuse feelings of power. The authors discuss implications for understanding the dynamics of power in social interactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-104
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Social Psychology
Volume149
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009

Keywords

  • Expectations
  • Power
  • Social information
  • Social interactions

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