A strong dose-response relation between serum concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and diabetes

Results from the National Health and Examination Survey 1999-2002

Duk Hee Lee, In Kyu Lee, Kyungeun Song, Michael W Steffes, William A Toscano, Beth A. Baker, David R Jacobs Jr

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE - Low-level exposure to some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has recently become a focus because of their possible link with the risk of diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Cross-sectional associations of the serum concentrations of POPs with diabetes prevalence were investigated in 2,016 adult participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002. Six POPs (2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-octachlorodibenzo-p- dioxin, oxychlordane, p,p′-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, and trans-nonachlor) were selected, because they were detectable in ≥80% of participants. RESULTS - Compared with subjects with serum concentrations below the limit of detection, after adjustment for age, sex, race and ethnicity, poverty income ratio, BMI, and waist circumference, diabetes prevalence was strongly positively associated with lipid-adjusted serum concentrations of all six POPs. When the participants were classified according to the sum of category numbers of the six POPs, adjusted odds ratios were 1.0, 14.0, 14.7, 38.3, and 37.7 (P for trend < 0.001). The association was consistent in stratified analyses and stronger in younger participants, Mexican Americans, and obese individuals. CONCLUSIONS - There were striking dose-response relations between serum concentrations of six selected POPs and the prevalence of diabetes. The strong graded association could offer a compelling challenge to future epidemiologic and toxicological research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1638-1644
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetes care
Volume29
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

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Health Surveys
2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl
Serum
Nutrition Surveys
Waist Circumference
Poverty
Toxicology
Limit of Detection
Research Design
Odds Ratio
Lipids
Research

Cite this

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title = "A strong dose-response relation between serum concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and diabetes: Results from the National Health and Examination Survey 1999-2002",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE - Low-level exposure to some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has recently become a focus because of their possible link with the risk of diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Cross-sectional associations of the serum concentrations of POPs with diabetes prevalence were investigated in 2,016 adult participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002. Six POPs (2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-octachlorodibenzo-p- dioxin, oxychlordane, p,p′-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, and trans-nonachlor) were selected, because they were detectable in ≥80{\%} of participants. RESULTS - Compared with subjects with serum concentrations below the limit of detection, after adjustment for age, sex, race and ethnicity, poverty income ratio, BMI, and waist circumference, diabetes prevalence was strongly positively associated with lipid-adjusted serum concentrations of all six POPs. When the participants were classified according to the sum of category numbers of the six POPs, adjusted odds ratios were 1.0, 14.0, 14.7, 38.3, and 37.7 (P for trend < 0.001). The association was consistent in stratified analyses and stronger in younger participants, Mexican Americans, and obese individuals. CONCLUSIONS - There were striking dose-response relations between serum concentrations of six selected POPs and the prevalence of diabetes. The strong graded association could offer a compelling challenge to future epidemiologic and toxicological research.",
author = "Lee, {Duk Hee} and Lee, {In Kyu} and Kyungeun Song and Steffes, {Michael W} and Toscano, {William A} and Baker, {Beth A.} and {Jacobs Jr}, {David R}",
year = "2006",
month = "8",
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language = "English (US)",
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journal = "Diabetes Care",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - A strong dose-response relation between serum concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and diabetes

T2 - Results from the National Health and Examination Survey 1999-2002

AU - Lee, Duk Hee

AU - Lee, In Kyu

AU - Song, Kyungeun

AU - Steffes, Michael W

AU - Toscano, William A

AU - Baker, Beth A.

AU - Jacobs Jr, David R

PY - 2006/8/1

Y1 - 2006/8/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE - Low-level exposure to some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has recently become a focus because of their possible link with the risk of diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Cross-sectional associations of the serum concentrations of POPs with diabetes prevalence were investigated in 2,016 adult participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002. Six POPs (2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-octachlorodibenzo-p- dioxin, oxychlordane, p,p′-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, and trans-nonachlor) were selected, because they were detectable in ≥80% of participants. RESULTS - Compared with subjects with serum concentrations below the limit of detection, after adjustment for age, sex, race and ethnicity, poverty income ratio, BMI, and waist circumference, diabetes prevalence was strongly positively associated with lipid-adjusted serum concentrations of all six POPs. When the participants were classified according to the sum of category numbers of the six POPs, adjusted odds ratios were 1.0, 14.0, 14.7, 38.3, and 37.7 (P for trend < 0.001). The association was consistent in stratified analyses and stronger in younger participants, Mexican Americans, and obese individuals. CONCLUSIONS - There were striking dose-response relations between serum concentrations of six selected POPs and the prevalence of diabetes. The strong graded association could offer a compelling challenge to future epidemiologic and toxicological research.

AB - OBJECTIVE - Low-level exposure to some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has recently become a focus because of their possible link with the risk of diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Cross-sectional associations of the serum concentrations of POPs with diabetes prevalence were investigated in 2,016 adult participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002. Six POPs (2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-octachlorodibenzo-p- dioxin, oxychlordane, p,p′-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, and trans-nonachlor) were selected, because they were detectable in ≥80% of participants. RESULTS - Compared with subjects with serum concentrations below the limit of detection, after adjustment for age, sex, race and ethnicity, poverty income ratio, BMI, and waist circumference, diabetes prevalence was strongly positively associated with lipid-adjusted serum concentrations of all six POPs. When the participants were classified according to the sum of category numbers of the six POPs, adjusted odds ratios were 1.0, 14.0, 14.7, 38.3, and 37.7 (P for trend < 0.001). The association was consistent in stratified analyses and stronger in younger participants, Mexican Americans, and obese individuals. CONCLUSIONS - There were striking dose-response relations between serum concentrations of six selected POPs and the prevalence of diabetes. The strong graded association could offer a compelling challenge to future epidemiologic and toxicological research.

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U2 - 10.2337/dc06-0543

DO - 10.2337/dc06-0543

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 1638

EP - 1644

JO - Diabetes Care

JF - Diabetes Care

SN - 1935-5548

IS - 7

ER -