A Short-Term Intervention Improves Nutrition Attitudes in Low-Income Women Through Nutrition Education Relating to Financial Savvy

Claire Rustad, Chery Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined how a short-term nutrition intervention influenced nutrition attitudes in a low-income, ethnically diverse population of women in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota (n = 118). Each woman received government assistance for food purchases, yet the majority felt that buying healthful food items was impossible on a tight budget. Educational sessions were aimed at increasing financial savvy in relation to purchasing healthful foods on a limited income. Attitudes regarding the ability to buy nutritious foods increased, whereas those reflecting an inability decreased. Government programs may benefit from financial education components directly related to nutrition to increase the health of poor, urban populations through improved financial literacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-223
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition
Volume7
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank all of the women who participated in this study. Further, we thank Amanda C. Martin, Lisa Franzen-Castle, Kristen Wiig Dammann, and Urvashi Pokhriyal for their assistance with this project. Additionally, we thank Johan Dirks, PhD, who provided valuable statistical guidance and consultation. This project was funded through USDA SNAP-ED.

Keywords

  • attitudes
  • financial savvy
  • food insecurity
  • low-income
  • nutrition education

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