A secondary injury prevention program may decrease contralateral anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes: 2-year injury rates in the ACL-SPORTS randomized controlled trial

JESSICA L. JOHNSON, JACOB J. CAPIN, AMELIA J.H. ARUNDALE, RYAN ZARZYCKI, ANGELA H. SMITH, LYNN SNYDER-MACKLER

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the addition of perturbation training to a secondary injury prevention program reduces the rate of second anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury compared to the prevention program alone. DESIGN: Single-blinded randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Thirty-nine female athletes who intended to return to cutting/pivoting sports were enrolled 3 to 9 months after primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Athletes were randomized to receive a training program of either progressive strengthening, agility, plyometrics, and prevention (SAPP) (n = 20) or SAPP plus perturbation training (n = 19); each had 10 sessions over 5 weeks. Occurrence and side of second ACL injury were recorded for 2 years after primary ACLR. RESULTS: There were 9 second ACL injuries in the 2 years after ACLR. There was no statistically significant difference in rate or side of second ACL injury between the SAPP-plus-perturbation training and SAPP groups. CONCLUSION: Adding perturbation training to a secondary ACL injury prevention program did not affect the rate of second ACL injury in female athletes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)523-530
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Volume50
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
1Biomechanics and Movement Science, University of Delaware, Newark, DE. 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE. 3Physical Therapy Program, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO. 4Eastern Colorado Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Aurora, CO. 5Brooklyn Nets, New York, NY. 6Department of Physical Therapy, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA. The study was conducted in its entirety at the University of Delaware. Some authors were PhD students in Biomechanics and Movement Science for the duration of the study. The study was approved by the University of Delaware Institutional Review Board and registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01773317), with funding provided by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (R01-AR048212). Dr Capin received funding from National Institutes of Health grant F30-HD096830 and from Foundation for Physical Therapy Research Promotion of Doctoral Studies levels I and II scholarships. Dr Capin’s postdoctoral training is funded by an Advanced Geriatrics Fellowship from the Eastern Colorado Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center (Veterans Affairs). The authors certify that they have no affiliations with or financial involvement in any organization or entity with a direct financial interest in the subject matter or materials discussed in the article. Address correspondence to Dr Jessica L. Johnson, Biomechanics and Movement Science, University of Delaware, 540 South College Avenue, Suite 210-Z, Newark, DE 19713. E-mail: john4458@umn.edu U Copyright ©2020 Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy®

Keywords

  • ACL
  • Female athletes
  • Perturbation
  • Return to sport
  • Secondary injury prevention
  • Young athletes

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