A roadmap for precision medicine research recruitment: Empirical assessment of the public's willingness to participate

Kelsey Moriarty, Susan M. Wolf, Patricia M. Veach, Bonnie Leroy, Ian M. MacFarlane, Heather A. Zierhut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: Precision medicine research recruitment poses challenges. To better understand factors impacting recruitment, this study assessed hypothetical willingness, public opinions of and familiarity with precision medicine research. Materials & methods: Adult attendees (n = 942) at the 2017 Minnesota State Fair completed an electronic survey. Results: Few respondents had heard of ‘precision medicine' (18%), and familiarity came mostly from media (43%). Fifty-six percent expressed hypothetical willingness to participate in precision medicine research. Significant predictors of willingness were: comfort with unconditional research; perceiving precision medicine research as beneficial, trustworthy and confidential; having a graduate degree; comfort with self- but not family-participation; and familiarity with precision/personalized medicine. Conclusion: This study identified predictors of hypothetical willingness to participate in precision medicine research. Alternative recruitment strategies are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-359
Number of pages15
JournalPersonalized Medicine
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • genetics studies
  • genomics studies
  • personalized medicine
  • precision medicine
  • recruitment

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A roadmap for precision medicine research recruitment: Empirical assessment of the public's willingness to participate'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this