A randomized trial of a brief intervention to increase fruit and vegetable intake: A replication study among callers to the CIS

Alfred C. Marcus, Jerianne Heimendinger, Diane Fairclough, Pam Wolfe, Barbara K. Rimer, Marion Morra, Richard Warnecke, John H. Himes, Sherri L. Darrow, Sharon W. Davis, Karen Julesberg, Rosemarie Slevin-Perocchia, Marie Steelman, Jean Wooldridge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Results are reported from a large randomized trial designed to increase fruit and vegetable consumption among callers to the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service (CIS) (n = 1, 717). Methods. CIS callers assigned to the intervention group (n = 861) received a brief proactive educational intervention over the telephone at the end of usual service, with two follow-up mailouts. Key educational messages and print material derived from the NCI 5 A Day for Better Health program were provided to intervention participants. Participants were interviewed by telephone at 4 weeks (n = 1, 307), 4 months (n = 1, 180), and 12 months for follow-up (n = 1, 016). Results. Results obtained from a single-item measure of fruit and vegetable consumption indicate a significant intervention effect of 0.88 servings per day at 4 weeks follow-up (P < 0.001), 0.63 servings per day at 4 months follow-up (P < 0.001), and 0.43 servings per day at 12 months follow-up (P < 0.001). Using a 7-item food frequency measure, an intervention effect of 0.63 servings per day was obtained at 4 weeks follow-up (P < 0.001), compared with 0.39 servings per day at 4 months follow-up (P = 0.002) and 0.44 servings per day at 12 months follow-up (P = 0.002). A 24-h recall assessment included in the 4-month interviews also yielded a significant intervention effect of 0.67 servings per day (P = 0.015). The vast majority of callers (90%) endorsed the strategy of providing 5 A Day information proactively within the CIS. Conclusions. This brief educational intervention was associated with higher levels of self-reported fruit and vegetable intake at both short- and long-term follow-up. Additional research is recommended to test this or a similar intervention in diverse populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-216
Number of pages13
JournalPreventive medicine
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Keywords

  • Cancer prevention and control
  • Diet
  • Health education
  • Telephone information services

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