A randomised pilot and feasibility study examining body weight tracking frequency and psychosocial health indicators

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Abstract

Daily weight tracking may enhance weight loss, but experimental data are scarce. This study tested feasibility of delivering varying weight tracking instructions, assessed adherence, and monitored psychosocial changes. Thirty adults were enrolled and randomised to daily or weekly tracking for 6 months. Study retention was 100%. Adherence averaged 97.5% with no group differences (p =.15). There were no group differences and minimal changes for depression, anxiety, and body image (p =.41-.82). Daily trackers reported fewer barriers (p <.01) at 3 months. The study was highly successful at delivering weight tracking instructions without adverse effects or diminished adherence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e399-e402
JournalObesity Research and Clinical Practice
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by a Grant-in-Aid of Research, Artistry, and Scholarship from the Graduate School of the University of Minnesota , Proposal #21417 . ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT0196692.

Keywords

  • Feasibility and acceptability
  • Psychosocial measures
  • Self-weighing
  • Standards of care
  • Weight tracking

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