A passive portable water pasteurization system for developing countries: Design, analysis and proof-of-concept experiments

Christianne V D R Anderson, Francis A. Kulacki

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The design, simulation, and testing of a novel portable pasteurization system suitable for the daily needs of four individuals are presented. This is the first self-powered, large-scale portable system developed to kill waterbome pathogens that contaminate current water supplies worldwide. The major components of the system consist of available technology: two evacuated solar collectors, a heat exchanger, two holding tanks, and a thermostatic valve. Flow of contaminated water through these components is permitted only when the temperature specified by the thermostatic valve is reached. Simulation of system performance is obtained via a lumped capacitance, time-dependent analysis with a limited number of input parameters. A prototype pasteurizer was designed and constructed, and proof-of-concept experiments were conducted in Minnesota in May 1998. The system was able to deliver nearly the predicted quantity of pasteurized water, approximately 70 liter/day.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Heat Transfer Division, (Publication) HTD
Pages299-304
Number of pages6
Volume366
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A passive portable water pasteurization system for developing countries: Design, analysis and proof-of-concept experiments'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Anderson, C. V. D. R., & Kulacki, F. A. (2000). A passive portable water pasteurization system for developing countries: Design, analysis and proof-of-concept experiments. In American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Heat Transfer Division, (Publication) HTD (Vol. 366, pp. 299-304)