A new in situ hybridization technique for spliced RNA species documents the bone marrow origin of pulmonary macrophages in chronic myelogenous leukemia

Pamela Ely, Ashley Haase, Steven Wietgrefe, Mary Zupancic, Janet Beneke, Marshall Hertz, Wesley Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Tissue macrophages derive from monocytes of bone marrow origin. Because monocytes from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) contain the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph), it seemed probable that tissue macrophages in CML would originate from the malignant clone. Using powerful molecular techniques, we studied pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) from two patients with CML. PAM from Patient 1, a patient in chronic phase studied before bone marrow transplantation (BMT), contained the Ph by Southern blot analysis. Patient 2, an accelerated phase patient, was studied after post-BMT relapse. PAM from this patient not only contained the Ph, but also expressed the BCR/ABL message documented by a new splice junction in situ hybridization technique. This new technique allows detection of BCR/ABL mRNA and determination of splice useage in individual cells. These data confirm the continued replenishing of PAM from peripheral blood monocytes in non-BMT settings and represent the first direct evidence that tissue macrophages are derived from the malignant clone in patients with CML.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2321-2325
Number of pages5
JournalBlood
Volume80
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992

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