A Network Analysis of High School and College Students’ COVID-19-Related Concerns, Self-Regulatory Skills, and Affect

Destany Calma-Birling, Philip David Zelazo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the lives of many high school and college students, and recent studies indicate increased emotional distress in this age group. We examined associations among 10 pandemic-related concerns, 21 affects, and three self-regulatory skills using crosssectional online survey data from high school and college students in two regions of the United States (Study 1: N = 392 and Study 2: N = 1,200). Network models of regularized partial correlation networks revealed both equifinal and multifinal pathways between specific COVID-19 concerns and positive and negative affects. In both studies, concern about conflict with parents was the pandemic-related concern most strongly connected to negative affects, mindfulness was most strongly connected to pandemic-related concerns and negative affects, and selfcompassion was most strongly connected to positive affects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)727-742
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican Psychologist
Volume77
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Character Lab Research Network played a supporting role in data collection, and we thank them for supporting and assisting with this research

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 American Psychological Association

Keywords

  • Covid-19 pandemic
  • Mindfulness
  • Network analysis
  • Parent conflict
  • Self-compassion

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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