A Multisite Study on Using Symptom-Targeted Interventions to Improve Mental Health Outcomes of Solid Organ Transplant Patients

Gracie Moore Greene, Joseph R. Merighi, Patricia Voorhes, Melissa McCool

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Depression and anxiety are common affective experiences during the first year following a solid organ transplant. This study examined the degree to which an evidenced-based clinical intervention implemented by social workers—Symptom Targeted Intervention—can alter self-reported depression and anxiety in heart, kidney, liver, and lung transplant recipients. Research Questions: This investigation explored 2 questions: (1) Can symptom-targeted interventions significantly reduce posttransplant recipients’ self-reported depression and anxiety at the conclusion of treatment and at 1-month follow-up? and (2) Does the response differ by gender? Design: A 1-group pretest–posttest design with a 1-month follow-up was used to test for changes in anxiety and depression after transplantation. Forty-eight patients at 2 US transplant centers were enrolled between January 2016 and May 2017. Data were collected using an online platform and analyzed to assess for differences over time and by gender. Results: Anxiety decreased significantly between pretest and posttest using the General Anxiety Disorder-2 (P <.05). Comparisons by gender indicated that women had a significant decrease in anxiety between pretest and posttest (P <.001); however, there was no significant decrease in anxiety for men. Analyses by gender and time yielded no significant differences for depression. Discussion: Symptom-targeted interventions have the potential to reduce anxiety in solid organ transplant patients and enhance their psychosocial adjustment after surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)132-139
Number of pages8
JournalProgress in Transplantation
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors would like to thank the University of Maryland Medical Center Medical Director of Post Kidney Transplant (Dr Charles Cangro) and the transplant surgeon team, the University of Utah Health Director of Abdominal Transplant Surgery (Dr Robin Kim), and the Director of Solid Organ Transplant Department (Kim Phillips), for their support and encouragement. The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This study received seed funding from the Society for Transplant Social Workers.

Funding Information:
The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This study received seed funding from the Society for Transplant Social Workers.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020, NATCO.

Copyright:
Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • depression
  • gender
  • symptom targeted intervention
  • transplantation

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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