A multiphysics model of the Pacinian corpuscle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Pacinian corpuscle (PC) is a dermal mechanoreceptor that responds to high-frequency (20-1000 Hz) vibrations. The PC's structure allows transmission of vibrations through its layers (lamellae) to the centrally-located nerve fiber (neurite). This work combines mechanical models of the PC with an electrochemical model of peripheral nerves to simulate the tactile response of the entire system. A three-stage model of response to a vibratory input was developed, consisting of (1) outer core mechanics, (2) inner core mechanics, and (3) neurite electrochemistry. The model correctly predicts the band-pass nature of the PC's frequency response, showing that the PC structure can amplify oscillatory strains within its target frequency band. Specifically, strain induced by a vibratory stimulus is amplified by a factor of 8-12 from the PC surface to the neurite. Our results also support the hypothesis that PC rapid adaptation is affected by the lamellar structures without requiring neuronal adaptivity. Simulated different-sized PCs showed a shift in frequency response, suggesting that clusters of different-sized PCs could enable more nuanced tactile encoding than uniform clusters. By modeling the PC's mechano-to-neural transduction, we can begin to characterize the mechanosensation of other receptors to understand how multiple receptors interact to create our sensation of touch.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1111-1125
Number of pages15
JournalIntegrative Biology (United Kingdom)
Volume8
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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Pacinian Corpuscles
Touch
Neurites
Frequency response
Mechanics
Vibration
Lamellar structures
Electrochemistry
Mechanoreceptors
Frequency bands
Peripheral Nerves
Nerve Fibers
Fibers
Skin

Cite this

A multiphysics model of the Pacinian corpuscle. / Quindlen, Julia C.; Stolarski, Henryk K; Johnson, Matthew D; Barocas, Victor H.

In: Integrative Biology (United Kingdom), Vol. 8, No. 11, 01.11.2016, p. 1111-1125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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