A model of childhood perceived peer harassment: Analyses of the canadian national longitudinal survey of children and youth data

Tanya N. Beran, Claudio Violato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors developed a model of childhood perceived peer harassment, using several personality, peer, and familial characteristics of victims, and tested it with children 10 to 11 years old (N = 3,434) drawn from the Canadian National Survey of Children and Youth, which is a stratified random sample of 22,831 households in Canada. A 3-step analytic procedure with 3 separate subsamples of the children was used to explore psychosocial correlates of peer harassment. Results from the latent variable path analysis (comparative fit index = .90) showed that victims are likely to feel anxious and disliked by their peers. Their parents reported using high levels of control and low levels of warmth with their children and reported high levels of depression and marital conflict themselves. These results are discussed from a social—cognitive perspective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-148
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Psychology: Interdisciplinary and Applied
Volume138
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004

Keywords

  • National longitudinal study of children and youth
  • Peer harassment

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