A Low-Cost, Grab-and-Go Breakfast Intervention for Rural High School Students

Changes in School Breakfast Program Participation Among At-Risk Students in Minnesota

Nicole I Larson, Qi Wang, Katherine Grannon, Susan Wei, Susie Nanney, Caitlin E Caspi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Evaluate the impact of a grab-and-go component embedded within a larger intervention designed to promote School Breakfast Program (SBP) participation. Design: Secondary data analysis. Setting: Rural Minnesota high schools. Participants: Eight schools were enrolled in the grab-and-go only intervention component. An at-risk sample of students (n = 364) who reported eating breakfast ≤3 d/wk at baseline was enrolled at these schools. Interventions: Grab-and-go style breakfast carts and policies were introduced to allow all students to eat outside the cafeteria. Main Outcome Measures: Administrative records were used to determine percent SBP participation (proportion of non-absent days on which fully reimbursable meals were received) for each student and school-level averages. Analysis: Linear mixed models. Results: School-level increases in SBP participation from baseline to the school year of intervention implementation were observed for schools enrolled in the grab-and-go only component (13.0% to 22.6%). Student-level increases in SBP participation were observed among the at-risk sample (7.6% to 21.9%) and among subgroups defined by free- or reduced-price meal eligibility and ethnic or racial background. Participation in SBP increased among students eligible for free or reduced-price meals from 13.9% to 30.7% and among ineligible students from 4.3% to 17.2%. Conclusions and Implications: Increasing access to the SBP and social support for eating breakfast are effective promotion strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-132.e1
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

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Breakfast
Students
Costs and Cost Analysis
Meals
Eating
Social Support
Linear Models

Keywords

  • breakfast
  • meals
  • outcome assessment
  • schools
  • students

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

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title = "A Low-Cost, Grab-and-Go Breakfast Intervention for Rural High School Students: Changes in School Breakfast Program Participation Among At-Risk Students in Minnesota",
abstract = "Objective: Evaluate the impact of a grab-and-go component embedded within a larger intervention designed to promote School Breakfast Program (SBP) participation. Design: Secondary data analysis. Setting: Rural Minnesota high schools. Participants: Eight schools were enrolled in the grab-and-go only intervention component. An at-risk sample of students (n = 364) who reported eating breakfast ≤3 d/wk at baseline was enrolled at these schools. Interventions: Grab-and-go style breakfast carts and policies were introduced to allow all students to eat outside the cafeteria. Main Outcome Measures: Administrative records were used to determine percent SBP participation (proportion of non-absent days on which fully reimbursable meals were received) for each student and school-level averages. Analysis: Linear mixed models. Results: School-level increases in SBP participation from baseline to the school year of intervention implementation were observed for schools enrolled in the grab-and-go only component (13.0{\%} to 22.6{\%}). Student-level increases in SBP participation were observed among the at-risk sample (7.6{\%} to 21.9{\%}) and among subgroups defined by free- or reduced-price meal eligibility and ethnic or racial background. Participation in SBP increased among students eligible for free or reduced-price meals from 13.9{\%} to 30.7{\%} and among ineligible students from 4.3{\%} to 17.2{\%}. Conclusions and Implications: Increasing access to the SBP and social support for eating breakfast are effective promotion strategies.",
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