A longitudinal study of work-related psychosocial factors and injuries: Implications for the aging United States workforce

Navneet K. Baidwan, Susan G Gerberich, Hyun Kim, Andrew Ryan, Timothy R Church, Benjamin Capistrant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: This study aimed to identify psychosocial work factors that may individually or, in combination, influence injury outcomes among aging United States (U.S.) workers. Methods: Data from the U.S. Health and Retirement Study (HRS) of 3305 working adults, aged 50 years and above, were used to identify associations between work-related psychosocial factors and injury incidence from 2006 to 2014, using adjusted incidence rate ratios. Results: Employees perceiving their work as high in psychological and physical demands/efforts, low in support, and rewards, compared to those in workplaces with low demands, high support, and high rewards, had a risk of injury two times greater. Males, compared with females, had a greater risk for injuries when interactions among several psychosocial work-related factors were modeled. Conclusions: The fact that important gender-based differences emerged when interactions among the psychosocial factors and injury were modeled, suggests opportunities for further research and potential interventions to enhance the working environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-221
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume62
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety (MCOHS), Education and Research Center, Pilot Projects Research Training Program, supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Grant number: OH008434

Funding Information:
This project was funded by the Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety (MCOHS), Education and Research Center, Pilot Projects Research Training Program, supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (OH008434). The contents of this effort are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or other associated entities. NKB, was primarily responsible for acquiring comprehensive knowledge of the intricacies of the very complex HRS database and designing the relevant methodological approach, conducting the data analyses, and preparing a draft manuscript following regular meetings and discussions with the research team of co-authors who also contributed to the manuscript. SGG and HK, mentored the primary author regarding study design and analysis during the entire research project, together with AR who additionally provided mentorship relevant to database management and analysis. TC, Biostatistician, provided insights and feedback on the overall project. BC with experience and expertise with the HRS, provided key input to this very complex and important effort. This project was funded by the Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety (MCOHS), Education and Research Center, Pilot Projects Research Training Program, supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (OH008434). The contents of this effort are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or other associated entities. Approval to conduct this study was obtained from the Institutional Review Board, University of Minnesota, under exempt review as de-identified secondary data were used. The authors identify no conflict of interests. Paul Landsbergis declares that he has no conflict of interest in the review and publication decision regarding this article.

Funding Information:
This project was funded by the Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety (MCOHS), Education and Research Center, Pilot Projects Research Training Program, supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (OH008434). The contents of this effort are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or other associated entities.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Keywords

  • aging workers
  • work-related injuries
  • work-related psychosocial factors
  • work-related stress

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