A longitudinal study of work-related psychosocial factors and injuries: Implications for the aging United States workforce

Navneet K. Baidwan, Susan G Gerberich, Hyun Kim, Andrew Ryan, Timothy R Church, Benjamin Capistrant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: This study aimed to identify psychosocial work factors that may individually or, in combination, influence injury outcomes among aging United States (U.S.) workers. Methods: Data from the U.S. Health and Retirement Study (HRS) of 3305 working adults, aged 50 years and above, were used to identify associations between work-related psychosocial factors and injury incidence from 2006 to 2014, using adjusted incidence rate ratios. Results: Employees perceiving their work as high in psychological and physical demands/efforts, low in support, and rewards, compared to those in workplaces with low demands, high support, and high rewards, had a risk of injury two times greater. Males, compared with females, had a greater risk for injuries when interactions among several psychosocial work-related factors were modeled. Conclusions: The fact that important gender-based differences emerged when interactions among the psychosocial factors and injury were modeled, suggests opportunities for further research and potential interventions to enhance the working environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-221
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume62
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019

Keywords

  • aging workers
  • work-related injuries
  • work-related psychosocial factors
  • work-related stress

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

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