A Longitudinal Study of Plasma Glycated Albumin across Pregnancy and Associations with Maternal Characteristics and Cardiometabolic Biomarkers

Wei Wei Pang, Stefanie N. Hinkle, Jing Wu, Paulina Stallcup, Michael Y. Tsai, David B. Sacks, Cuilin Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Glycated albumin (GA) has recently been proposed as a screening marker for diabetes among non-pregnant individuals. However, data on GA during pregnancy are sparse and lacking among women of diverse race/ethnicity. We investigated longitudinal concentrations of GA among multiracial pregnant women in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Fetal Growth Studies–Singletons. METHODS: We quantified GA and cardiometabolic biomarkers using longitudinal plasma samples collected at 10 to 14, 15 to 26 (fasting), 23 to 31, and 33 to 39 gestational weeks from 214 pregnant women without gestational diabetes. We examined the distribution of GA across pregnancy and its association with participants’ characteristics including race/ethnicity, pre-pregnancy body mass index (ppBMI), and selected cardiometabolic biomarkers. GA trajectories were estimated using a latent class approach. RESULTS: Medians (interquartile range) of GA concentrations were 12.1% (10.6%–13.4%), 12.5% (10.7%–13.8%), 12.4% (10.9%–13.5%), and 11.5% (10.4%–12.5%) at 10 to 14, 15 to 26, 23 to 31, and 33 to 39 weeks, respectively. There were no significant differences in the pattern among different race/ethnic groups (P > 0.53). A minority of women exhibited a GA trajectory characterized by a high concentration of GA at 15 to 26 weeks. GA concentrations were inversely related to ppBMI and plasma low-density lipoprotein and triglyceride concentrations, but were not significantly related to hemoglobin A1c, fasting insulin, or glucose over pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: In this study of individuals who were normoglycemic before pregnancy, plasma GA concentrations stayed relatively constant over pregnancy, decreasing only in late pregnancy. GA concentrations were inversely related to ppBMI and suboptimal lipid profiles, but did not appear to be a sensitive marker for glucose metabolism in pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1420-1428
Number of pages9
JournalClinical chemistry
Volume69
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2023. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Association for Diagnostics & Laboratory Medicine.

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

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