A longitudinal examination of athletes' emotional and cognitive responses to anterior cruciate ligament injury

Michael A. Morrey, Michael J. Stuart, Aynsley M. Smith, Diane M. Wiese-Bjornstal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

104 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the emotional and cognitive impact of injury and surgery on physical recovery in injured athletes. Design: A prospective longitudinal study comparing the psychosocial and physical recovery of competitive and recreational athletes. Setting: Tertiary-care sports medicine center. Participants: Twenty-seven athletes (15 men and 12 women) who required anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Interventions: A repeated-measures design used to compare the psychosocial and physical changes for 6 months after ACL surgery. Main Outcome Measures: Emotional (mood) and cognitive (coping) functions and physical recovery (range of motion, physician-rated level of recovery, and physician permission to return to sport). Results: There was a significant time-effect difference in mood, with a greater mood disturbance and recovery rate for competitive athletes than recreational athletes. Differences in mood and pain coping were significant at 2 weeks and 2 months after surgery. Conclusion: Athletes experience significant mood changes throughout rehabilitation, which may hinder rehabilitation early in the process. Longer-term rehabilitation was not impacted by mood or pain coping. Future studies might focus on examining the process over a longer time period (1-2 years after surgery). Physicians should be aware of these findings and appropriately counsel and motivate athletes toward more favorable positive psychological and physical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-69
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Journal of Sport Medicine
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1999

Fingerprint

Athletes
Rehabilitation
Physicians
Pain
Sports Medicine
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Tertiary Healthcare
Articular Range of Motion
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries
Cognition
Longitudinal Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Psychology
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Anterior cruciate ligament
  • Mood
  • Pain, coping
  • Psychological processes
  • Surgery, anterior cruciate ligament

Cite this

A longitudinal examination of athletes' emotional and cognitive responses to anterior cruciate ligament injury. / Morrey, Michael A.; Stuart, Michael J.; Smith, Aynsley M.; Wiese-Bjornstal, Diane M.

In: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, Vol. 9, No. 2, 04.1999, p. 63-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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