A lake sediment stable isotope record of late-middle to late Holocene hydroclimate variability in the western Guatemala highlands

Nathan D. Stansell, Byron A. Steinman, Matthew S. Lachniet, Jacob Feller, William Harvey, Alejandro Fernandez, Christopher J. Shea, Brittany Price, Jason Coenen, Maxwell Boes, Stephen Perdziola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Long-term perspectives on past hydroclimate variability provide context for evaluating the potential future impacts of changes in Northern Hemisphere temperatures and oceanic-atmospheric circulation on the timing and distribution of precipitation in Central America. Here we use the isotopic composition of fine-grained (< 63 μm), endogenic CaCO318Ocalcite and δ13Ccalcite) from Lake Kail, located in the western highlands of Guatemala, to infer multi-decadal to multi-centennial-scale variability in the balance between precipitation and evaporation (P/E) over the last ∼6000 years. The sediment age model is based on 210Pb and 41 14C ages, with chronological uncertainty estimated using Bayesian methods. A model that couples lake hydrology and isotope mass balance is applied to characterize the isotopic responses of lake water and calcite to changes in drought-controlling climate variables such as precipitation, temperature and relative humidity. The δ18Ocalcite variations indicate intermediate-to-dry P/E conditions during the late-middle Holocene from ∼6000 to ∼4100 cal yr BP. There was then a shift to drier conditions at the start of the late Holocene until ∼3050 cal yr BP, followed by a trend to wetter conditions until ∼1500 cal yr BP. The most recent ∼1500 years is characterized by high and relatively stable P/E, with particularly wet intervals from ∼1500 to 1170 cal yr BP and from 470 to 260 cal yr BP. Comparisons of the Lake Kail δ18Ocalcite record with Central American/circum-Caribbean proxy datasets spanning the late-middle and late Holocene indicate northern tropical hydroclimate changes were highly variable across space and time and were likely driven by regional oceanic-atmospheric responses with a secondary influence by insolation forcing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number116327
JournalEarth and Planetary Science Letters
Volume542
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank Mark Abbott, Silvia Cortes, Pauline Décamps, Matthew Finkenbinder and Osmin Vasquez. This project was supported by the National Science Foundation Paleo-Perspectives on Climate Change program ( EAR-1502989 , EAR-1503069 , EAR-1502740 ). Additional funding was provided by Northern Illinois University , the Las Vegas Isotope Science Lab at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas ( NSF , EAR-0521196 ), the University of Minnesota Duluth , and The Geological Society of America , Graduate Student Research Grants program. University of Delaware Precipitation, GPCC Precipitation, and NCEP_Reanalysis 2 data provided by the NOAA/OAR/ESRL PSD, Boulder, Colorado, USA, from their web site at https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/ .

Funding Information:
We thank Mark Abbott, Silvia Cortes, Pauline D?camps, Matthew Finkenbinder and Osmin Vasquez. This project was supported by the National Science Foundation Paleo-Perspectives on Climate Change program (EAR-1502989, EAR-1503069, EAR-1502740). Additional funding was provided by Northern Illinois University, the Las Vegas Isotope Science Lab at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (NSF, EAR-0521196), the University of Minnesota Duluth, and The Geological Society of America, Graduate Student Research Grants program. University of Delaware Precipitation, GPCC Precipitation, and NCEP_Reanalysis 2 data provided by the NOAA/OAR/ESRL PSD, Boulder, Colorado, USA, from their web site at https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Central America
  • insolation
  • northern tropics
  • oxygen isotopes
  • precipitation

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