A holistic monitoring approach for water quality BMP and Forest Watershed Risk assessment

Robert A Slesak, Jennifer Corcoran, Richard Rossman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of water quality BMPs during forest harvesting reduces potential impacts to water quality, and previous monitoring work has documented high levels of BMP use. However, the utility of past monitoring efforts for water management is limited, because monitoring estimates are provided at large scales and lacking situational context conducive to local management. Here we present a framework for holistic monitoring at the watershed scale that incorporates estimates of BMP implementation with forest disturbance metrics and watershed characteristics to qualitatively evaluate the risk of forestry activities impacting water quality in a given watershed. Using three case study watersheds in Minnesota, USA, we demonstrate that forest disturbance patterns and BMP implementation are variable across watersheds, and the implications of these differences for water quality are dependent on the physical characteristics of a watershed such as stream density, soil properties, and topography. An implicit assumption in our assessment is that risks of water quality degradation are greatest with lower levels of BMP implementation and where forest disturbance is concentrated in time and space. The monitoring approach is being used in Minnesota to guide adaptive management at the watershed scale to preemptively address water quality risks associated with forestry activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-290
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Forestry
Volume116
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 4 2018

Fingerprint

forested watersheds
risk assessment
water quality
watershed
monitoring
disturbance
forestry
adaptive management
water management
space and time
logging
topography
soil properties
soil property
case studies
degradation

Keywords

  • Adaptive management
  • Cumulative effects
  • Forestry water quality
  • Watershed disturbance
  • Watershed planning

Cite this

A holistic monitoring approach for water quality BMP and Forest Watershed Risk assessment. / Slesak, Robert A; Corcoran, Jennifer; Rossman, Richard.

In: Journal of Forestry, Vol. 116, No. 3, 04.05.2018, p. 283-290.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Slesak, Robert A ; Corcoran, Jennifer ; Rossman, Richard. / A holistic monitoring approach for water quality BMP and Forest Watershed Risk assessment. In: Journal of Forestry. 2018 ; Vol. 116, No. 3. pp. 283-290.
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